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Full text of "Elchanite (Brooklyn, New York, N.Y.), 1960"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/elchanitebrookly1960unse 



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PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 
Brooklyn 

2270 Church Avenue, Brooklyn 26, New York 







CONTENTS 



3 


DEDICATION 


4 


SCHOOL 


5 


ADMINISTRATION 


6 


TALMUD FACULTY 


8 


HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 


15 


GRADUATES 


41 


Honors 


42 


Diary 


49 


ACTIVITIES 


50 


Elchanite Staff 


52 


General Organization 


55 


Student Court 


56 


Arista 


58 


Topics 


60 


Kolenu 


61 


Bulletin 


62 


Atom 


63 


Math 


64 


Y.O.C. 


66 


Debating 


68 


Variety Nite 


70 


Chagigas 


72 


Library 


74 


Service Squad 


76 


Chess 


77 


Sports 


78 


Basketball 


81 


J.V. 


82 


Swimming 


84 


Bowling 


84 


Intramurals 


85 


LITERATURE 


86 


Heroic Encounter—By W. Reich 


87 


Flanagan— By J. Wolf 


88 


Vechoolay— By M. Nadel 


90 


World-By S. Rosenberg 


90 


The Joy of Giving— By J. Kestenbaum 


91 


Billy-By S. Rosenberg 


92 


Poem-By W. Reich 


92 


Asceticism— By B. Vogel 


93 


Fredrick Charles Hopkins— by Ronald Tauber 


94 


The Visitors— By M. Agulnek 


95 


By the Sweat— By A. Hochstein 


96 


Epic of Middle Slates 


97 


ADVERTISEMENTS 


26 


SENIOR DIRECTORY 








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HEROIC ENCOUNTER 




Man is an enigma. Since his creation lie lias continually vacillated 
between the summit, which appears within his grasp and the abyss 
of destruction which he narrowly avoids. His life is a constant 
struggle: good versus evil; idealism versus materialism: benevolence 
versus malevolence. Each generation must, and will, fight the 
battle for sanity and civilization, one which constantly rages, for 
on the outcome of this incessant conflict depends man's fate. Man's 
entire history is a story of battles which must be refought and con- 
quests which must be rewon. 

But conflict also exists on the personal level. Every individual 
must find his own level of "truth," and, as life's spiral of complexi- 
ties grows, must resolve once more his lusts, vices and weaknesses, 
and achieve harmony, unity and brotherhood through faith in G-d 
and a desire for the common good. 

The theme of this yearbook is this dual conflict— an eternal 
Armageddon— the Heroic Encounter. 

K. Klein 
H. Fischer 




Rabbi Abraham N. Zuroff. Principal 



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^ 



ADMINISTRATION 




Mr. Samuel Levine. Director 




Dr. Samuel Belkin, President 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 




Dr. Shelley R. Saphire, Supervisor, 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOLS 








I Rabbi Samuel Fink 



Rabbi Pincus Shebshaievit/ Rabbi Josepii Epstein 



Rabbi Zeio Schussheiui 




FACULTY 




Talmud 




.o"3an 




Rabbi Harold B. Kanotopsky Rabbi Herman Franicel Rabbi Solomon Drillman Rabbi Daniel Weinbach 



^f 




Mr. Joseph Brand 




English 



STRESSING the fundamentals of composition 
and a knowledge of world and American 
literature, our four-year Enghsh curriculum pro- 
vides an excellent background in spoken and 
written English. For the lower termers the pro- 
gram consists mainly of technical English, while 
in the upper classes the classics and modern 
literary trends are scrutinized. The English period 
also serves as a forum for class meetings. 

Because of the increased emphasis placed on 
scholarship exams, the English staff helps to pre- 
pare the students for these tests and can be justly 
proud of its achievements. 




Mr. Simon Lippner 






Mr. Jacob D. Godm 



Mr. Joseph B. Strum 



Dr. Max Horwitz^ Deceased 






Mr. Robert E. Bassell 



Mr. Sidney Gold 



Mr. Arthur Arluck 




/r* 



Dr. Jechiel Lichtenstein 





Languages 



AN important part of the school curriculum is 
^the Language Department, which offers four 
years of Hebrew language (compulsory) and two 
years each of either French or Spanish. Besides 
the elements of grammar and vocabulary, the 
culture and development of the people or nation 
discussed are studied. After three years of Hebrew 
language and literature seniors take a course in 
Jewish History. 




Mr. Isaac J. Cantor 




Mr. Jacob Soshuk 





Mr. Alvin Kamber 



Mr. FrancisCallan 





Rabbi Yaakov Dardac 





Mr. Morris Septimus 



Mr. Louis Cooper 




Mr. Harry Goldstein 





^'^ucU, 



Mathematics 



Mr. Henry Mayer 



10 




IT is no strange coincidence that math is voted 
the most popular subject, while the math 
teachers are always in the running for the stu- 
dents" favorites. Our curriculum requires but two 
and one-half years of math— Elementary Alge- 
bra, Tenth Year Math, and Intermediate Algebra. 
However, many students take advantage of the 
electives which include Trigonometry, Advanced 
Algebra, and a one-term course in Analytic 
Geometry and Calculus. 



Sciences 



THE large proportion of Y.U.H.S.B. graduates 
continuing tiieir education in the field of science 
is, in itself, a fine tribute to the work of our science 
instructors. Students are required to take a year 



each of General Science and Biology, but the am- 
bitious ones take full advantage of both Chemistry 
and Physics. 

With the well-timed arrival of the much-her- 
alded laboratory, replete with equipment for in- 
dividual experimentation, students will now be 
able to perform experiments formerly demon- 
strated by the teacher. 





Mr. Samuel Lebowitz 



Mr. George Davidson 





Mr. David Schiff 





Mr. Martin Lilker 



Mr. Lowell Sanders 



Social Studies 



TAKING a long view of history. Y.U.H.S.B. 
students start on hieroglyphics and work their 
way forward during three and one-half years of 
Citizenship Education. World Geography, World 
History, American History, and Economics (all 
compulsory). The Social Studies class also serves 
as a soapbox for would-be politicians, as the 
class analyzes and debates current problems of 
the day. 



Mr. David Getz 





Mr. Isidore Melov 





Mr. Arthur Becker 



Mr. Morris Purcell 




Art 




Physical 
Education 



Mr. Harry Allan 



Music 



MINORS, consisting of Art, Music, and Phys- 
ical Education are ofTered in the freshman 
and sophomore years. In Art, presided over by 
Mr. H. Allan, the elements of design are empha- 
sized, while in Music, taught by Mr. L. Leibo- 
witz, the classics are studied. In Mr. Morse's 
much-Iooked-forward-to gym class, dental notes 
and nok-hockey are stressed. 




Mr. Harry Morse 



Guidance 




Rabbi Matthew Clark 



THE Guidance Program was instituted to orient 
freshmen, and supply seniors with information 
concerning colleges and scholarships. Regret- 
tably, Mr. Martin Lilker, who had served as 
Guidance Counselor for five years, left his posi- 
tion to become administrator of Manhattan Cen- 
tral. However, Rabbi Matthew Clark, his replace- 
ment, provided a fresh approach to our problems. 



13 



Office Squad 



The members of the Office Squad, in addition 
to faithfully performing their tasks, are suf- 
ficiently far removed from the administration to 
be on very friendly terms with the studentry. 
Mrs. Yetta Rosenman, secretary to the principal, 
acts as chief mediator in student faculty relations. 
Jay Blazer, Assistant Bursar and puller-of-the- 
purse-strings, is always ready with financial ad- 
vice, while Mrs. Harriet Hochdorf, executive 
secretary, collects our tuition with her famous 
smile. 




Mrs. Yetta Rosenman, 
Secretary 




Mrs. Hiiiriet Hochdorf aided by Mayer Unterherg. 




Mr. John Santiago, 
Chiej Custodian. 




Mr. Jacob Blazer 



Maintenance 



THIS year our Maintenance Squad, under the 
able direction of John Santiago and assisted 
by his son Ralph and an ever-changing staff, was 
called on to do extra duty in preparation for the 
Middle States visit. Besides insuring cleanliness 
of our school's physical plant, "John" runs the 
food concession and is very popular with the 
student body. 



14 











15 






i 



DAVID ACKERMAN 

Junior Varsity Basketball Team 5; Class 
Athletic Manager 5. 7; Ticket Commission 6; 
Intramurals 3-8. 

"Acky," our import from Rhode Island, 
joined our ranks in his sophomore year. Pos- 
sessor of the school foul-shooting record, he 
has spent many a happy lunchtime shooting 
hoops in our open-air gym. His quiet, unas- 
suming nature and patience will prove valu- 
able in his contemplated career of teaching. 

"Multum in Parvo— Much in Little." 

R.I. Motto 



CHARLES ADLER 

Elchanite Activities Editor 7, 8; Bulletin Man- 
aging Editor 7. 8; Co-op Travel Squad 1. 2, 
Salesman 3, 4, Manager 5, 6; Swimming Team 
5-8; Chess Team 5, 6; Topics Feature Staff 4; 
Topics Circulation Staff 3; Audio-Visual Squad 
1-3; Service Squad 1, 2; Elections Commission 
1, 2, 4, 8; Hausman Award 3; Class Vice- 
President 1, 3; Class Debating 1-8, Manager 
7; Intramurals 1-6. 

Chuck, a co-founder of the N.B.S.. was also 
the Swimming Team's talented breast-stroker. 
An Editor of the Bulletin and Elchanite, his 
journalistic ability brought many smiles to 
readers' lips. He will switch from lips to teeth 
next year when he majors in pre-dent at 
Brooklyn. 

"Nothing great was achieved without en- 
thusiasm." 

Emerson 



MARTIN ALLAN AGULNEK 

Elchanite Typing Editor 7, 8; Topics Business 
Staff 2-4; Captain of Bowling Team 7, 8; 
Topics Bulletin 4-8; Student Court Justice 8; 
Atom Staff 1-6; Library Squad 2, 4; Topics 
Circulation Manager 5-8; Elchanite Art Squad 
7, 8; Class Debating Manager 8; Class Debat- 
ing 1-4; Intramurals 1-8. 

Ready, willing and able to put a skilled hand 
to a typewriter, conscientious Marty managed 
to keep our spirits high with his sense of 
humor. His ability to solve The Coop's mara- 
thon Math problems should serve him well as 
he studies chemical engineering at City. 

"A merry heart maketh a cheerful counte- 
nance." 

Proverbs 



Inner Sancta. 










ARTHUR ALEXANDER 

Swimming Team 5-8; Topics Business Staff 
1-6, Manager 7, 8; Topics Typing Staff 4; 
Service Squad 4; Lost-and-Found Manager 
3-8; J.V. Scorer 3; Class Elchanite Business 
Manager 1, 7, 8; Class Debating 1-3. 

The industrious head of our Lost-and-Found 
managed to find time from his frequent treks 
outside of school grounds to participate in 
school activities, such as: heading the Radio 
Club and swimming for the Varsity. He hopes 
to make use of his manual dexterity by filling 
the cavities of his future patients. 

"Have Deck, Will Travel." 

Dealt from Paladin 





BERNARD BEER 

Varsity Basketball Scorer 7, 8; Library Squad 
6; Class President 8; Class Vice-President 2, 
3, 5; Class Secretary 6; Class Debating 6-8. 

Reticent during his first two years, Bernie's 
talents for impersonating several members of 
our faculty provided us with many enjoyable 
lunch hours and Chagigas. Our official Varsity 
Scorer will major at Yeshiva in modern lan- 
guages, inspired by his Spanish mentor, Senor 
Cantor. 

"When Beer goes in, wit comes out." 

Callan 



HARRIS L. BERENHOLZ 

Arista 8; Student Court Justice 7; Kolenu 
4-8; Atom Staff 6; Hebrew Library 4-6; Class 
Charity Collector 4, 6; Class President 7; Class 
Elchanite Business Manager 8; Class Debating 
3-5, Manager 6. 

Joining us in our sophomore year from 
Brighton Yeshiva. "Hesh" readily acclimated 
himself to our school. He continually surprises 
us with his facility for quoting poetry from 
many varied sources. Undecided as to his 
future occupation, our easygoing classmate 
will continue his studies at Brooklyn. 

"Religion's in the heart." 

Jerald 



17 






MITCHELL BERZON 

A latecomer to the scene at Y.U.H.S.B., 
Mitch lost no time in becoming the arch- 
enemy of the Doc. Our import from Baltimore 
Yeshwa will continue his policy of negativity 
at Brooklyn. 



"Who so would be i 



nonconformist . . ." 
Emasculated Emerson 



RONALD BLEIER 

Topics Business Staff 2-6: Co-Capt. Varsity 
Tennis Team 7, 8; Varsity Ping-Pong 4-6; J.V. 
Coach 7; Bulletin Reporter 5, 7, 8; Atom Staff 
6; Topics Typist 5: Atom Typist 5; J.V. 5; 
J.V. Scorer 3; Class Athletic Manager 6-8; 
Class Debating 1-8; Intramurals 1-8. 

Ronnie's interest in athletics has led him to 
coach the J.V. and follow closely the daily 
equine encounters. A boy of diversified tastes, 
his chief mental preoccupation has always 
been philosophy. He hopes to go to the head 
of the class as a teacher. 

"G-d forbid that I should go to any heaven 
in which there are no horses." 

Cunninghame-Graham 




18 



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DAVID BLOOM 

Co-op Travel Squad 6; Class Athletic Manager 
1; Class Debating 1, 2, 7; Class Basketball 
Team 1; Class Slapball Team 1-5. 

Dave, chief importer of the exotic Twang, 
was a favorite target of Rabbi Weinbach. Re- 
ligiously attending the bowling alley, he spent 
two years in Room 105, where his skills in 
demolition made him a worthy asset. With a 
feeling of gratitude for Y.U.H.S.B.. Dave will 
pursue a teaching career at Hunter. 

"What this country needs is a five cent pack 
of cigarettes." 

K. Topsky 







JONAH BOTKNECHT 

Elchanite Photography Editor 7, 8; Service 
Squad Lieutenant 7; Topics Photography 4-6; 
Bulletin Reporter 5, 6; Varsity Basketball 
Manager 7, 8; Scorer 5, 6; Atom Staff 4; 
Hebrew Library 1; Elchanite Art 1, 2; Variety 
Nite 6; Class Debating 4. 

Famous for his exploits north of the border, 
Jonah spent his senior year snapping shutters 
for the Elchanite and as "Jonah-on-the-spot" 
for the Varsity hoop squad. Possessor of the 
school's only Presidential sweater, our ex- 
lieutenant of the Service Squad will prefix 
doctor to his title at Brooklyn. 

"You're a genius J. B.! You've done it 
again J. B.!" 

J. B. 



MYRON BURSKY 

Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8; Service 
Squad 1-4; Chess-Checkers Club 1-3; Science 
Club 4; Class Basketball Team 3. 

Ambassador of good will from Cockashama- 
hia, Myron kept us and himself in stitches over 
the past years with his various pantomimes. 
His financial prowess, which qualified him for 
the position of Elchanite Business Manager, 
will be further developed as a business admin- 
istration major. 

"A sweetheart, G-d bless'm." 

The Beak 



MARK DISKIND 

Arista 7, 8; Chess Team 5, 6; Variety Nite 2-6, 
Co-Leader 7, 8; Service Squad 6; Class Presi- 
dent 8; Class Secretary 1, 4, 6, 7; Chief Justice 
of Student Court 8. 

Our golden-throated chess enthusiast, Mark 
displayed an amazing talent for citing the 
sources of many obscure biblical tracts. High 
and low harmonizer for the "batlonim," he 
attained the honored position of Student Court 
Chief Justice. Mark will continue collecting 
chess games and studying genetics at Y.U. 

"1 would rather be remembered by a song 
than a victory." 

Smith 



19 






HAROLD PEINE 

Head of Kashruth Commission 5, 6; Topics 
Photography Editor 7, 8; Topics Business 
Staff 6; Y.O.C. 1-8; Service Squad 1. 2; Library 
Book Agency 4-6; Elchanite Business Staff 1; 
Class Debating 2-4. 

Director of candy machines. Hesh engi- 
neered a daring price rise in sweets and 
introduced Clark Bars on which students 
could release their pent up emotions. A sin- 
cere devotee of B'nai Akivah and the Y.O.C. 
Hesh will start on the first lap of a career in 
business by spending a year in Israel. 

"Write me as one who loves his fellow men." 
Abou ben Adhem 



MARTIN FELDMAN 

Captain Chess Team 5-8; Service Squad 1; 
Chess-Checkers Club 1; Intramurals 1-8. 

Top checkmater of our school in his junior 
and senior years, Marty's interests do not lie 
entirely with intellectual sports. Well-known 
for his aggressive defense in both schoolyard 
basketball and football, he will apply his 
dogged perseverance at City in the pursuit 
of an accounting career. 

"Attack, Attack, Attack!" 

Napoleon 



HARVEY FISCHER 

School Debating Manager 7; Editor-in-Chief 
of Topics Bulletin 7, 8, Associate Editor 5, 6; 
Editor-in-Chief of Atom 5, 6; Math Team 7; 
Atom Staff 3, 4; Topics News Staff 2, 3; Topics 
Business Staff 3; Kolenu Staff 2; Service Squad 
1,2; Class Debating Manager 2-4. 

Laughing his way through four years of high 
school, Harvey "Flash"ed his way into prom- 
inence by heading a number of school publi- 
cations. Perennial head of his class debating 
team in his first three years, he elevated him- 
self to the post of school Debating Manager. 
Harvey will apply his varied talents to bio- 
chemistry at Columbia. 

"Vox populi omnia vincit generally." 

Slimey Fisch 




20 




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Hark. The Shark! 



JEFFREY FROST 

Swimming Team 5-8; Track Team 7, 8; 
Hebrew Library Squad 2, 3; Head of Hebrew 
Library 4-8; Topics Business Staff 4-6; Variety 
Nite 2; Varsity Research 6; Kolenu Typist 6; 
Class Debating 1, 5; Intramurals 1-8. 

Our handsome representative from Brigh- 
ton Beach, Jeff spent much of his time dis- 
cussing religion with Kenny and cummuting 
between Church and Snyder Aves. Working 
as head of the Hebrew Library has contributed 
greatly to his success as a swimmer on our 
Varsity Swimming Team. Possessor of a 
radiant smile, he plans to major in dentistry. 

"He prayeth best who loveth best." 

Coleridge 






EITAN FRYDMAN 

Y.O.C. 7, 8. 

Our only mustached senior, tall, silent Eitan 
joined us only this year. A Sabra, he has been 
successful in revivifying our interest in his 
native land. Blessed with Mr. Gold for English 
he will complete his mastery of English at 
Y.U. this fall. 

"Virtue is the performance of pleasant ac- 
tions." 

Old Elchanite 



LEONARD R. GLOTZER 

Kolenu 2; Bowling Team 7, 8; Ping-Pong 
Team 3; Elchanite Business Staff 4; Class 
Debating 6, 7. 

Laconic Lenny surprised us all with his 
high scores in both sections of the College 
Boards, while in bowling, our Kenmore Kegler 
was seldom surpassed. Undecided about his 
future, our Boro Park buddy plans to continue 
his studies at Brooklyn. 

"Things are in the saddle and ride man- 
kind." 

Stephens Emerson 



21 






IRA LLOYD GOBER 

Variety Nite 1-6. Co-Leader 7. 8: Student 
Court Justice 7; Capt. of Service Squad 8; 
Topics Business Staff 4, 5; Topics Bulletin 4; 
English Library 2; Varsity Research 5; Class 
Debating 1, 2, 6; Service Squad 6; Class El- 
chanite Business Manager 7; Intramurals 1-6. 

Ira Lloyd made his marl; in Y.U.H.S.B. in 
the field of entertainment as Leader of Variety 
Nite. In his senior year, this swingin' accor- 
dion player branched out to the Student Court 
and the captaincy of the Service Squad. He 
will study accounting next fall at City College. 

"... a little dab will do ya." 

Brylcreem 



ALTER GOLDSTEIN 

Service Squad 3. 4; Varsity Manager 5-8; J.V. 
Manager 4; Class Debating Manager 7; Class 
Secretary 7; Intramurals 1-7. 

Alter, a faithful aide to the J.V. and Varsity 
hoopsters and consistent etuidant de la classe 
garbage for the past two years showed his 
mettle by winning a Scholarship and pulling a 
650 average on the College Boards. He hopes 
to keep up the good work at Brooklyn. 

"Better late than never." 

Heywood 



Portrait of a senior. 





JACK GREENBLATT 

Class Debating Team 1. 2; Subscription 
Bureau Asst. Manager 5; Science Club 1, 2; 
Hebrew Culture Club 3, 4. 

Not a stickler for conformity. Jack spent 
four years in Y.U H.S.B. explaining himself. 
His sense of humor, which showed itself under 
the most unpredictable conditions, amused us 
all. He will continue his education at Brooklyn 
College. 

"To be great is to be misunderstood." 

Old Elchanite 




Waiting for next. 






DANIEL GREENFELD 

Topics Feature Staff 5-6; Atom Feature 
Writer 6; Service Squad 1; Class Debating 
1-6; Election Commission 7. 

Danny. Y.U.H.S.B.'s best-read senior, al- 
though haunted by the Sign of the Claw, and 
called everything from F. Greenfield to just 
plain Black, managed to get through it all 
with his ever-ready sense of humor. Using 
green ink on his drafting boards, he will major 
in engineering at Brooklyn. 

"Speak with Roman bluntness." 

Sidney 



STANLEY GUREWITSCH 

Elchanite Art Editor 7, 8; Kolenu 4; Elchanite 
Art Squad 1-4; Atom Art Staff 5; Topics Art 
Staff 5; Co-op Staff 5, 6; Hausman Award 3; 
Class Vice-President 1; Class Debating 4; 
Intraraurals 1-6. 

An affable fellow. "Silent Stan the Taxi- 
Man." saved us much bus fare by driving us 
home on Sundays. An excellent worker, his 
conscientious efforts above and beyond the call 
of duty will help him achieve success at Brook- 
lyn in the field of medicine. 

"I never met a man I didn't like." 

Rodgers 



MURRAY HOCHBERG 

Arista 8; School Debating Manager 6; Math 
Team 6-8; Lieut. Service Squad 7; Chess Team 
7, 8; Varsity Research 5; Atom Math Staff 5, 6; 
Topics Business Staff 5; Topics Typist 4; 
Bulletin Typist 6, Reporter 4, 5; Library Jour- 
nals Staff 4; Service Squad 1-4; Class Vice- 
President 7; Class Secretary 4; Class Debating 
1-8, Manager 5. 

"Murphy," our red-haired Math wonder 
from Toras Emes excelled in games of the 
mind and was a two-year member of the 
Chess Team. Winning the M.A.A. medal in 
his junior year is an added incentive for Mur- 
ray to major in Math at Y.U. 

"Mathematics is the queen of sciences." 

Gauss 





m 




MARTIN HOCHSTEIN 

Student Court Justice 5; School Charity Col- 
lector 8; Kolenu 3. 4, 8; Y.O.C. 4-8; Topics 
Business Staff 4-6; Hebrew Library Squad 5. 
6; Track Team 5-8; Service Squad 1-5; Class 
President 4; Class Debating Team 3-6. 

After beating the U.S. to the punch with an 
anti-missile missle, Avi turned from politics 
to extortion and became School Charity Col- 
lector. He will continue his religious activities 
at Y.U. where he will major in pre-med. 

"Charity equals all the other command- 
ments." 

Rav Assi 



SIDNEY HOOK 

Lieutenant Service Squad 8; Library Security 
Squad 6; Class Elchanite Business Manager 
6; Chagigas 7; Class Debating Team 5; Intra- 
murals 1-6. 

After reading every history book in the 
library, Sid turned his attention to the section 
containing "Sifray Hakodesh." Surprising ev- 
eryone, he culminated his basketball efforts 
by gaining acceptance to the Varsity during 
his senior year. Sid will continue his religious 
studies at Y.U. and will major in history. 

"The nearer of kin, the sooner in." 

Forman 



SIMEON HOOK 

Elchanite Art Editor 7, 8, Art Squad 1-6; 
Kolenu 2; Atom Art Editor 5. 6; Varsity 
Ping-Pong Captain 7. 8; Chagigas 7, 8; Library 
Journal Art Editor 5. 6; Service Squad 4, 
Lieutenant 8; Class Debating 4; Intramurals 
1-6. 

Y.U.H.S.B.'s answer to Frank Lloyd Wright, 
Simmy spent his mornings decorating his 
Gemmora with blueprints. An art editor of 
many school publications, he also found time 
to police the institution as a lieutenant of the 
Service Squad. He will build himself up for a 
career in architecture at Pratt. 

"If the world's a wilderness, go build houses 
on it." 

Larcom 



Slaiiowh, but siirelv. 



24 






No brain wasli — just a quick rinse. 



BENJAMIN HULKOWER 

School Vice-President 7; School Debating 
Manager 5; Student Court Justice 5; Service 
Squad Sergeant 3, 4, Lieutenant 6; Varsity 
Debating 3-8; English Library 1; Variety Nite 
1-6, Leader 7, 8; Topics Feature Staff 3; 
Kolenu 4; Topics Business Staff 3; Chagigas 
3-8; Lab Asst. 3; Hausman Award 5; Class 
President 3; Class Debating Manager 2, 4; 
Class Debating 1-6. 

Originator of the "talkathon" and imitator 
of Mr. Gold. Benjy spent the last three years 
advising and getting acquainted with the 
freshmen. His political experiences both as 
Vice-President and Debating Manager and 
his oratorical prowess will no doubt serve him 
in good stead in pursuit of a diploma from 
City, where he'll major in psychology. 

"It is a great art to sell wind." 

The Consensus 





PAUL HERBERT HOROWITZ 

Hausman Award 7; Varsity Basketball 7. 8; 
J.V. Basketball 3-5; Varsity Research 6; Class 
Debating Manager 6; Class Athletic Manager 
5; Class Debating 4-8; Intramurals 1-6. 

Blossoming into a Varsity ballplayer in his 
senior year. Paul was a perennial nemesis of 
Danny and Doc. He will continue debating 
his way towards a law degree at Brooklyn 
College. 

". . . it's how you play the game." 

The Coach 




DAVID KAPLAN 

Arista 6-8; Co-Captain Bowling Team 8; Sub- 
scription Bureau Asst. Manager 6: Topics 
News Staff 4, Business Staff 4-8. Typist 4; 
Atom Typist 5; English Library 2: Service 
Squad 2; Hausman Award 3; Class President 
1. 2; Elchanite Business Manager 6: Class 
Debating 2-6; Intramurals 1. 2. 

Dave, who spends his time in Y.U.H.S.B. 
during the off-season, proved his versatility 
by spinning into the co-captaincy of the Bowl- 
ing Team .4 whiz at Math, Dave figures to 
be a good bet for engineering at City. 

"The sport of kings." 

SommerNdlle 



25 





KENNETH KLEIN 

Elchanite Co-Editor 7, 8; Arista 4-8: Vice- 
Leader 7; Topics Feature Staff 3-5, Editor 
6-8; Hausman Award 3, 5; Co-op Staff 1-4, 
Manager 5. 6; Math Team 5, 6, Captain 7. 8: 
Math Editor of Atom 4-6; Varsity Debating 
5-8; Chagigas 7, 8; Class Vice-President 2, 
Secretary 3; Debating 1-8. Manager 1. 

Kenny, an excellent student, smashed the 
school M.A.A. record and compiled a perfect 
average on all his Math Regents and finals. 
Specializing in walking over the guidance 
counselor and blasting homers into Bedford 
Avenue, he will continue rationalizing his 
denominators at Columbia College. 

"Almost everything that is great has been 
done by youth." 

Disraeli 



BARRY KOPF 

Elchanite Business Manager 7. 8; Topics 
Business Staff 6; Kolenu Staff 2; Service 
Squad 3-5; Class Vice-President 2; Class De- 
bating 2-8; Class Debating Manager 1; Intra- 
murals 1-5. 

Official clock-watcher in the highest shiur. 
Barry's chief claim to fame were his accom- 
plishments in the terpsichorean art. His 
impeccable taste in clothing and his ready 
smile will stand him in good stead at Yeshiva 
where he will major in pre-law. 

"At least once a year everyone is a genius." 
Manny W. 





The Ping-Pong Game. 



GARY KRAVITZ 

Topics Feature Staff 7, 8; Track Team 1-4; 
Math Team 7. 8: J.V. Basketball 3, 4; Haus- 
man Award 5; Class Athletic Manager 4, 6, 8; 
Class Debating 3-6; Intramurals 1-8. 

A strong individualist. Gary never hesitated 
to speak his mind and stand for what he 
thought was right. His all-around athletic 
ability and mathematical aptitude are but a 
few of the many talents he will take with him 
to Columbia and a future in medicine. 

"I feel like a fugitive from the law of aver- 
ages." 

Mauldin 



26 



^<3 €:>- 




Halls of Ivy. 






BERNARD LANTER 

English Library Squad, 2; Atom Typing Squad 
6; Class Debating Team 4, 7; Topics Business 
Staffs. 

A two year man in "Club 105," Bernie was 
admittedly shaken up after being Matt-ed 
during Twang War I. After being given the 
business for four years, he will attempt a 
reverse and major in it at City. 

"Honezzty iz the bezt polizy." 

A.N.Z. 



JACK LEVENBROWN 

Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8; Topics 
Business Staff 3, 4, Manager 5, 6; Ticket 
Bureau 3, 7, 8, Manager 4-6; Topics Bulletin 
Typist 3, 5; Topics Circulation Staff 4, 8; Class 
Elchanite Business Manager 4, 5; Service 
Squad 3, 4; Hausman Award 3, 5; Class De- 
bating 5. 

"Smilin Jack," the power behind the ad 
blank, has raked in money for everything from 
Elchanite to Young Israel dances. He plans 
to change from filling quotas to filling teeth 
at Yeshiva U. 

"In G-d we trust— Men pay cash." 

Old Elchanite 



DAVID N. LEVINE 

Varsity Basketball 5. 6, Captain 7, 8; Elchanite 
Activities Editor 7, 8; Student Court Justice 
6; Topics News Staff 1-4, Editor 5-8; Topics 
Typing Editor 3-4; Elchanite Art Squad 1-4; 
Variety Nite 1, 2; Chagigas 3-8; Hausman 
Award 3; Class President 6, 8; Class Vice- 
President 3; Class Debating 1-6; Elchanite 
Business Manager 1, 2; Service Squad 1, 2; 
J.V. Basketball 3, 4; Class Secretary 2. 

Possessor of one of the school's nattiest 
wardrobes, "Dapper Dave" acquired many 
personalities to keep us laughing at our 
Chagigas. A fine athlete and a competent 
journalist, "The Lev" applied his talents to 
both the Topics and Elchanite. He will major 
in pre-law at Brooklyn. 

"Wit is the salt of conversation." 

Hazzlitt 






PHILIP LEVITZ 

Topics Business Staff 5. 6; Y.O.C. 7. 8; Ticket 
Bureau 6-8; Hebrew Library 7, 8; Class Vice- 
President 6; Class Debating 6. 

Our swarthy Spanish student spent many 
happy hours checking on the Central situation. 
A favorite target of Rocky, "Philipe" will 
continue his education at Brooklyn while 
majoring in dentistry. 

"When destiny says, 'Thou must,' the 
youth replies, 'Who me?' " 

Snort 



STANLEY LIKER 

Topics Business Staff 4; Library Squad 4, 5; 
Y.O.C. 7; Class Elchanite Business Manager 
2, 3, 8; Class Debating Team 5. 
Stan's quiet manner and sharp apparel earned 
him many friends, and his varied talents make 
him a handy man in time of need. He plans to 
continue making friends at Y.U. where he 
will study law. 

"Everybody likes a Liker " 

Dragged from Doris D. 



28 




LESLIE LIPNICK 

Head Hebrew Librarian 4, 5; Kolenu 2, 4-6 
Elchanite Photo Squad 3, 4; Y.O.C. 7, 8 
Hebrew Library 3, 6; Topics Typing Staff 4 
English Library Typing Staff 4; Lab Asst. 4 
Atom Staff 3; Service Squad 3, 4; Class Presi- 
dent 7; Class Secretary 1, 2; Class Debating 
2-6, Manager 3, 5. 

Well-known for his impersonations of "zee 
goode Docteur," Leibel spent his four years 
at Y.U.H.S.B. advancing the causes of B'nei 
Akiva. Zionism and the Boy Scouts of Amer- 
ica. His experience in bandaging knees and 
mending split trousers will provide him with 
a good background for kibbutzing in Israel 
next year. 

"My heart is in the East— and I in the utter- 
most West." 

Ha-Levi 



That makes 
eight Shafts. 



t^ 





. and slated for 105 . 



MANNY MELLER 

Topics Business Staff 3, 4; Atom Staff 5, 6; 
Chagigas 7, 8; Varsity Research 6; Class Sec- 
retary 1; Class Debating 1-5, 8. 

Commissioner of Schoolyard Basketball, 
Manny combined rugged competitiveness with 
spirited colloquialisms. His scientific prowess 
coupled with keen desire should make him a 
good bet as a bio or chem major at Yeshiva. 

"Start shoveling John, it's a quarter to 
one." 

M. M. 




The symbol of Yin and Yang 
represents the opposing and com- 
plementary life forces of the 
world. The dark begets the light 
and the light begets the dark in 
ceaseless alternation. 





LEWIS JAY MUFSON 

Arista 8; Head of Minyan 5, 6; Topics Business 
Staff 2-6; Y.O.C. 1-6, Head 7, 8; Service Squad 
1-2, 6; Class Charity Collector 1, 5. 

Jay, usually seen around the building with 
his partner in crime, introduced the hound 
tooth hat and became one of the big wigs on 
the Yarmulka Commission. Our Minyan and 
Mishmar Head hopes to continue helping 
people as a doctor after he finishes school at 
Yeshiva University. 

"Ubber es iz kusher?" 

Pete 



MARK NADEL 

Variety Nite 1, 8; Topics Bulletin Typing 
Staff 4; Service Squad 6. Captain 8; Class 
Athletic Manager 1. 7; Class Debating 3-5; 
Class Secretary 4, 5, 8. 

Mark, holding the dubious record of having 
the most books ripped up in a single Gemorra 
season takes it in good stride. "Joses" integrity 
is evidenced by his captaincy of the Service 
Squad. Because "There's nothing shady about 
Nady." Brooklyn College will gain a fine 
student when he will be a "Math Major" next 
year. 

"Laughter is not at all a bad beginning for 
a friendship." 

Wilde 



29 






CHARLES NUSSBAUM 

Elchanite Business Manager 8; Swimming 
Team 1-4, Captain 5-8; Track Team 3, 4; Ten- 
nis Team 1, 2; Service Squad 4, 5, Lieutenant 
6-8; J.V. Basketball 3-5; Bulletin Reporter 5, 
6; Class President 5; Class Debating 3-6; 
Intramurals 1-8. 

Popular Charlie, besides selling sweaters 
and rating Central, has also captained the 
Swimming Team for the past two years, lead- 
ing the team to victory in his senior year. 
Appointed Business Manager, this versatile 
chap will major in business administration at 
Brooklyn. 

"Who knows not to swim goes to the bot- 
tom." 

Lee 



STEPHEN PLOTCH 

Arista 7, 8; Literary Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; 
Service Squad 3; Class Vice-President 7, 8; 
Class Secretary 5: Class Debating Team 3, 4. 

A flare for journalism and scholarship mark 
Steve's tenure in Y.U.H.S.B. Highlighting his 
high school career, he served as Elchanite 
Literary Editor, and a member of the N.H.S. 
Next year he will exchange his poetry note- 
books for test tubes while majoring in chem- 
istry at Brooklyn. 

"Knowledge is the food of the soul." 

Plato 





The 11 O'clock Conference. 



MARTIN M. PLOTZKER 

Track Team 6, 8; Class Debating Team 6-8; 
Intramurals 3-8. 

Often confused with an instructor bearing 
the same initials, "M. P.." and joining us in 
his junior year. Marty soon made his presence 
felt. His sense of humor livened up many an 
otherwise dull bull session. He will tickle many 
a funnybone at Brooklyn next year where he 
will take up accounting. 

"Tzvei, tzvei, un Plotzker." 

A Lipton Tea Taster 



30 




Church and Bedford 









GARY POLLACK 

Head of Minyon 5-8; Topics Business Staff 
2-6; Y.O.C. 1-6, Co-Head 7-8; Service Squad 
1-6. 

Gary partook of practically all the religious 
extra-curricular activities offered at Y.U.H. 
S.B. Well-known for his musical capers with 
comb and tissue paper, he also amused us 
with his impersonations of several "rebbis," 
He will try his hand at doctoring or dentistry, 
for which he will prepare at Y.U. 

"I have a little shadow." 

Lewis J. 



KENNETH PRAGER 

G.O. President 7, 8; Arista 4-8; Kolenu Editor- 
in-Chief 3-6; Elchanite Activities Editor 7, 8; 
Topics Feature Editor 5. Managing Editor 
6-8; Student Court Justice 5, 6; Varsity Bas- 
ketball 5, 6. Captain 7, 8; Tennis Team 4, 6; 
Swimming Team 7, 8; J.V. Basketball 3, 4; 
Variety Nite 5, 6; Hausman Award 3, 5; Class 
President 2-6; Class Debating 1-6. 

Kenny, two term G.O. President, was our 
representative at President Eisenhower's 
Youth Conference. While simultaneously 
serving the CO.. Elchanite. Topics, and Kol- 
enu, he was also captain and high scorer of 
the Basketball Team. Kenny will continue 
his career of serving his fellow students while 
studying pre-med at Columbia. 

"Execution is the chariot of genius." 

H. F. Amiel 



MAURICE REIFMAN 

Elchanite Business Manager 8; Atom Science 
Editor 5, 6; Tennis Team 6. Captain 7, 8; 
Lab Asst. 1-8; Class Secretarj' 3; Service Squad 
4; Audio-Visual Commission 5-6. 

Our emissary from the rolling hills of dis- 
tant Laurelton, Maurice became supervisor 
and bouncer of our once limited but now 
"Middle"-size laboratory. With four years 
experience at demonstrating class experiments 
to his baffled science instructors, he will con- 
tinue to electrify his professors when he 
majors in physics at Poly. 

"The shortest distance between two points 
... is quite a trip." 

The Dashing Commuter 



31 



■li 





/ 




ANDREW REINHARD 

G.O. Vice-President 8; Elchanite Activities 
Editor 7. 8; Student Court Chief Justice 6; 
Topics Sports Staff 5. 6. Editor 7. 8; Swim- 
ming Team 7, 8; Kolenu Business Staff 4; 
Service Squad 5. Lieutenant 6, Captain 7; 
Class President 7; Class Vice-President 6; 
Intramurals 1-6. 

Despite a ninety average. Andy had so much 
trouble in Big Bob's class that he had to go 
by aliases. His ability in Shakespeare will 
save him from being Cooped up in a Math 
class, as he plans to attend Brooklyn and 
major in pre-law. 

"And all my children too-ooo?" 

Shaken from Shakespeare 



FRED ROSEN 

Swimming Team 5-8; Topics Business Staff 5. 
6; Atom Typing Staff 5. 6; Service Squad 3; 
J.V. Basketball 3: Intramurals 1-8. 

The "Umbrella Man" brought life to his 
favorite pastime by forming the C.A.F. and 
"Shelly. Alex and Fritz Inc." Fred, a free 
styling non-conformist who starred for the 
Swimming Team, will shed his cape for a lab 
jacket next September at Yeshiva. 

"I have not yet begun to fight." 

J. P. Jones 



MARTIN H. ROSEN 

Elchanite Photography Editor 7, 8; Library 
Service Squad Head 5-7; Varsity Research 
Squad 3-6; Chagigas 7, 8; English Library 
4-6; Hebrew Library 5, 6; Class Debating 
Team 1-6. 

One of Mr. B's ex-good men, Marty spent 
much of his spare time working as chief of the 
Library Service Squad in the former coal bin 
of Y.U.H.S.B. His good nature and willingness 
to help made him an indispensable asset to 
the Elchanite Photography Squad. At college, 
he will major in pre-med. 

"Peek-a-boo, B. B. is watching you." 

R. E. B. 



$9 






Fireman Biiggs: "For use during the fire drill. 



SHELDON ROSENBERG 

Elchanite Art Squad 1-4, 6-8; Topics Business 
Staff 1-4; English Library 2; Service Squad 1; 
Atom Typing Staff 3; Class Secretary 1; Intra- 
murals 1-4. 

One of the sharpest dressers in the history 
of our school, Shelly's revolutionary new 
methods of leaving the school never ceased to 
amaze us. Shelly's artistic talent will stand 
him in good stead in Pratt where he will 
major in architecture. 

"Neither a borrower nor a lender be." 

Shakespeare 






NATHAN ROSENBLATT 

Topics Bulletin 2-8; Atom Staff 3-8; Office 
Squad 7, 8; Class Debating Team 2-6. 

WA2DNZ, as he is known by his fellow 
hams, attempted to popularize the field of 
electronics by heading the radio club. True to 
form, he will continue wiring circuits next fall 
at Brooklyn where he will major in pre- 
engineering. 

"CQ, CQ, CQ." 

S. O. S. 



MORRIS RUBENSTEIN 

J.V. Basketball 3-5, Coach and Manager 7, 8: 
Class Athletic Manager 5; Intramurals 1-8. 

Morris, the face behind the sandpaper 
beard, was preoccupied with all fields of 
athletics, particularly basketball, throughout 
his sojourn at our school. J.V. "Coach of the 
Year," he also served as manager of our 
future Varsity hopefuls. He will continue his 
education at Y.U. where he hopes to score in 
a law career. 

"He who has a beard is more than a youth." 
Shakespeare 



Vox ui's n:Dm trsa nya nion nam XT'! 
2 : 'J nincD 





LOUIS ELY SAVADER 

Asst. J.V. Coach 5-6; Class Athletic Manager 
2, 4; Class Elchanite Business Manager 3; 
Intramurals 1-8. 

Auspicious for his absences, Louis originated 
the signed, mimeographed admit. When in 
school he majored in athletics and minored in 
academics, a program he will follow in re- 
verse at Brooklyn, majoring in engineering. 

"Conspicuous by his absences." 

Matthew 1:05 



MELVIN C. SCHIFF 

Variety Nite 1-8; Class Debating Manager 7, 
8; Class Elchanite Business Manager 6; Serv- 
ice Squad 6; Chagigas 7, 8. 

Partaking in all of Y.U.H.S.B.'s major en- 
tertainment productions. Mel's talent and 
versatility were appreciated by all. Aspiring 
to major in the field of education, he will 
attend Brooklyn next year, after which he 
hopes to obtain his Ph.D. 

"It keeps its head." 

Harry and Bert P. 



34 





IRVING SHEINMAN 

Service Squad 2-4; Class Debating Team 7, 8; 
Intramurals 7. 8; Chess Club 1-2. 

A stolid fellow, Irv, one of Borough Park's 
finest, was gregarious enough to make many 
friends. He plans to transfer his activities to 
City, where, we are sure, his many assets will 
make him a success. 

"Silence is more eloquent than words." 

Carlyle 



//'.? all riglil buddy, 
they're combination locks. 




16-24-38-Hike. 






GARRY SKLAR 

Arista 8; Elchanite Art Squad 2; J.V. Debating 
Team 2, 3; Topics Business Staff 1-6; Ticket 
Bureau Manager 5-8; Bulletin Sports Staff 4; 
Class Debating Manager 2; Class Debating 
1-8. 

"Gairry," after finishing his work in Mr. 
Sanders' class, found time to head and enlarge 
the Ticket and Subscription Bureaus. His 
proficiency in social studies was a major fac- 
tor in his election to the National Honor 
Society. 

"That great American . . ." 

Sanders 



STEVEN A. SOLOMON 

School Athletic Manager 5; Elchanite Typing 
Editor 7, 8; J.V. Coach 5, 6; Student Court 
Justice 7; Varsity Bowling 8; Bulletin Staff 2; 
Atom Typing Staff 2-6; Service Squad 1; J.V. 
Basketball 3, 4; Class President 8; Class Ath- 
letic Manager 2-4. 

One of the most likeable and hard-working 
guys around, "Solly's" activities as school 
Athletic Manager and J.V. Coach enabled 
him to make friends on all sides. His patience 
and goodwill will stand him in good stead in 
his teaching career. 

"Comedy is the fountain of sound sense." 
Meredith 



MONTE SPERLING 

School Athletic Manager 7: Variety Nite 1-4; 
Varsity Bowling 7. 8; Topics Business Staff 
3-6; Library Squad 6; Service Squad 4; Class 
Secretary 5-6; Class Athletic Manager 8; Class 
Elchanite Business Manager 2, 3. 

Monte's proposed innovations regarding 
nok-hockey and volleyball, swept him into the 
office of Athletic Manager. Although no vol- 
leyball league was created, he did. however, 
expertly coordinate the Y.U.H.S.B. athletic 
program. His effervescent personality will 
continue making him friends at Hunter. 

"Let there be nok-hockey ... on a bicycle 
built for two." 

Henry Ford 



35 



KT 







ALBERT L. TALLANT 

Service Squad 2, 4: Math Club 3; Radio Club 1. 

"Augie." or "Albie," a prominent member 
of the C.A.F., spent his four years in and 
"OUT" of classes. His more serious talents 
include French and art— the latter of which 
he will put to good advantage at City, where 
he will major in architecture. 

"Doing what is impossible for talent is 
genius." ' 

H. F. Amiel 



KALMAN TUCHMAN 

Elchanite Art 1-4, 7, 8: Kolenu 5, 6: Topics 
Business Staff 5, 6; Hebrew Glee Club 4; Office 
Squad 5, 6. 

Beneath Kal's reserve, friends found a very 
warm personality. An expert on photography 
and a fine artist, Kal's advice was sought by 
the Topics and Elchanite alike. He will be a 
pre-dent major at N.Y.U. 

" 'Tis only noble to be good." 

Tennyson 



MAYER UNTERBERG 

Elchanite Photography Editor 7. 8; Head of 
Office Squad 5-8; Elchanite Typing Staff 5, 6; 
Topics Bulletin 5-8; Atom Staff 5-8. 

Mayer, our snaphappy shutterbug, kept 
students and teachers on their toes with his 
candid Polaroid. He tore himself away from 
the Mizrachi Hatzoir presidency long enough 
to become adroit at the fine arts of book distri- 
bution, button pressing and coffee percolating. 
Engineering will be his major at Brooklyn 
next fall. 

"On three, Whiskey, Gin, — " 

The Photographer 



A Winner — in one easv lesson. 



36 






Neither rain, nor sleet, nor. 



BARRY VOGEL 

Arista 5-7, Vice-Leader 8; Topics News Staff 
3, 4; Topics Bulletin 5, 6; Kolenu 5; Math 
Team 7, 8; Y.O.C. 3, 4; Hebrew Library 3, 4; 
Hausman Award 3, 5, 7; Class President 5; 
Class Debating 2-5, Manager 3, 4. 

Quiet through his four years at Y.U.H.S.B., 
Barry, a very studious fellow, achieved prom- 
inence in his senior year as Vice-Leader of 
Arista. He will undoubtedly come out of all 
his exams with high marks and a red neck as 
he majors in science at Y.U. 

"What is needed for learning is a humble 
mind." 

Confucius 





LARRY WALLER 

School Debating Manager 8; Elchanite Pho- 
tography Editor 7, 8; Variety Nite 3-6, Co- 
Leader 7, 8; Varsity Debating 4-8; Topics 
Business Staff 1-6; Chagiga Leader 7, 8; Atom 
Staff 3, 4; Class Vice-President 7; Class 
Debating 1-8, Manager 6, 7; Class Secretary 1. 

Our Man-Tanned Romeo, Larry was instru- 
mental in organizing two funny chagigas and 
a successful Variety Nite during his senior 
year while holding the post of school Debating 
Manager. Possessor of a very good head for 
figures, Larry will major in business and 
accounting at City. 

"Where there is youth, thou willst find 
variety." 

Knight 



MARTIN WANGROFSKY 

Arista 6-8; Co-op Staff 2, 4; Topics Feature 
Staff; Topics Circulation Staff 4-6; Class Vice- 
President 3; Class Athletic Manager 2-5; Class 
Debating 4; Intramurals 1-8. 

An avid fan of all sports, Marty himself 
excels at ping-pong and schoolyard basket- 
ball. His scholastic abilities are on a par with 
his athletic talents as is evidenced by his 
Arista membership. He will major in engi- 
neering at Brooklyn. 

"The only way to have a friend is to be one." 
Emerson 



37 






BENJAMIN WEBERMAN 

Topics News Staff 5; Variety Nite 3, 4; Haus- 
man Award 5; Class Debating Team 3-6. 

The red hair of Y.U.H.S.B.'s answer to Jack 
Kerouac and Burl Ives attests conversely, to 
his even-tempered good nature. In the realm 
of fashion no one can "beat" Benjy. Familiar 
with the intricacies of the Hebrew and beat 
languages, he will have no trouble making 
himself understood if he goes to Israel or 
Greenwich Village next year. 

"Distinction with a difference." 

Green Fielding 



You get 

more taste by far — 

in a Clark Bar. 



38 




DAVID Z. WEINSTEIN 

Lieutenant of Service Squad 8: Elchanite Art 
2, 7, 8; Bulletin Typist 3-8; Atom Typist 5-6; 
Hebrew Library Squad 7: Class Debating 1, 2; 
Class Elchanite Business Manager 7; Intra- 
murals 1-4. 

Davey. an excellent typist always ready to 
lend a hand, has turned his boundless energy 
into a fine scholastic record, although one 
day, while doing a meticulous job for R.E.B., 
he came into conflict with "higher authorities." 
Majoring in mathematics at Brooklyn his 
hundred average on Math Regents will serve 
him in good stead. 

"Jiggers! The Service Squad." 

Blackie Carbon 




ZEV WEINSTEIN 

Topics Business Staff 7; Hebrew Library 2-5; 
Intramurals 1-4; Science Club 4. 

Zev, during his tenure at Y.U.H.S.B. dis- 
played a talent for making friends and apply- 
ing judo holds. Having an affinity for 
chemistry, he will continue making friends 
while majoring in that science at Brooklyn 
next fall, 

"Nothin' like some friendly exercise." 

Maverick 




STi iwy ^^^ nsi iDu^n '?v nsi 
.i?ima nayi lyn Dvn 






MANNY WEISS 

Co-Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; Captain of Service 
Squad 7; Elchanite Art 1-6; Topics Art 5, 6; 
Kolenu Art 5-8; Varsity Research 5; Service 
Squad 1, 2, 5, 6; Class President 6, 7; Class 
Secretary 5, 8; Class Debating 4-6. 

Manny developed into a first-rate artist 
after inauspicious beginning as a doodler in 
Mr. Allan's art class. Voted handsomest senior, 
he was very active in the art departments of 
the Elchanite and Kolenu, and will major in 
architecture at Pratt. 

"I have nothing to declare but my genuis." 
Barry K. 



JACK WOLF 

Lieutenant of Service Squad 7; Hebrew 
Library 1, 2; Hebrew Library Head 3-5; Kol- 
enu Staff 3-6; Elchanite Art Squad 5-8; Y.O.C. 
1-4; Hausraan Award 3; Class Debating 1, 2. 

Jack of the curly hair and creative crayon 
has proven his proficiency in both art and 
literature by his fine contributions to the 
Elchanite. Constantly topped with a wool sock 
cap, he will major in engineering at Brooklyn. 

"Imagination is the eye of the senses." 

Hubert 



MITCHEL L. WOLF 

Topics Editor-in-Chief 5-8; Elchanite Literary 
Editor 7, 8; Student Court Justice 8: Topics 
Feature Staff 3, 4; Varsity Debating 3-8; Math 
Team 7, 8; Service Squad 5; Hausman Award 
3, 5, 7; Arista 4-7, Leader 8; Class President 1; 
Class Vice-President 2; Class Debating 1-8; 
Intramurals 1-8. 

Although the possessor of an enviable schol- 
astic average and winner of numerous scholar- 
ships. Mitch will be better remembered for his 
fine sense of humor, journalistic talent and all 
around ability. We can truly say that next year 
Y.U.H.S.B.'s loss will be Yeshiva's gain, as 
Mitch prepares for a medical career. 

"Meech, you are sleeping?" 

Peerless Pete 

39 




in:Kir-rf*i%Wv\\"fta » 




GARY B. WOLFF 

Bulletin Associate Editor 5, 6, Sports Editor 
7, 8; Varsity Basketball 5-8; Alternate Student 
Court Justice 6; Varsity Bowling 6-8; Topics 
Sports Squad 3, 4; Topics Bulletin 3, 4; J.V. 
Basketball 3, 4; Service Squad 1, 3; Class Vice- 
President 6; Class Athletic Manager 1; Class 
Debating 1-4, 8. 

One of the proudest members of the M.J.H. 
S.L. All-Star Team. Getz's interest in sports 
was responsible for most of his extra-curricular 
activities. His journalistic ability enabled him 
to be Sports Editor of the Bulletin. Next year, 
he will commence pre-med studies at Brook- 
lyn College. 

"The real criterion is the selection of the 
All-Star Team." 

Getz 



MICHAEL WOLFF 

Elchairite Editor-in-Chief 7, 8; Arista 4-8, 
Leader 7; Chief Student Court Justice 5; 
Topics Copy Editor 5, 6; Topics Feature Staff 
3-8; Varsity Debating 2-8; Swimming Team 
Co-Captain 5, 6, Captain 7, 8; Varsity Basket- 
ball 7, 8; Varsity Track 3-6, Captain 7, 8; J.V. 
Basketball 3, 4; Managing Editor of Atom 5, 
6; Hausman Award 3, 5, 7; Class President 1-3; 
Class Vice-President 5; Intramurals 1-6. 

"General" Mike, is the possessor of one of the 
finest and most varied extra-curricular records 
in Y.V.H.S.B. As Elchanite Editor-in-Chief, 
he was often seen chasing after recalcitrant 
students who hadn't fulfilled their ad quotas. 
He plans to study social sciences at Yeshiva, 
which will surely be a continuation of an al- 
ready extraordinary career. 



"I whistle a happy tune.' 



The Moose and I 



40 



&SE-: 





MURRAY ZANGEN 

Elchanite Art Editor 7, 8; Elchanite Art Squad 
1-6; Swimming Team 5-8; Bowling Team 7, 8; 
Chagigas 7, 8; Varsity Basketball Timer 7, 8; 
Class Secretary 7; Intramurals 1-8. 

Swept into office as Sanitation Manager of 
the Garbage Class. Muzz kept in trim for the 
Swimming and Bowling Teams by rolling 
marbles freestyle across the floor. His success 
in the State Science exam has heightened his 
aspirations towards a career in chemical en- 
gineering which he will major in at Brooklyn. 

"He who makes no noise is the most danger- 
ous." 

Doc 



Remember when 







"iJlono/ig 



National Merit Scholarship Corporation 

Winner 
Mitchel Wolf 

Finalist 
Kenneth Klein 



Charles A die r 
Mark Diskind 
Daniel Greenfeld 



Certificate of Merit 
Martin Hochstein 
Stephen Plotch 
Kenneth Prager 



Andrew Reinhard 
Barry Vogel 
Michael Wolff 



General Motors Scholarship Program 

Winner 
Mitchel Wolf 

Finalist 
Kenneth Klein 



National Honor Society Scholarship 

Finalist 
Kenneth Klein 

Semifinalist 

Mark Diskind Daniel Greenfeld 

Mitchel Wolf 

Brooklyn Jewish Postal Workers Scholarship 
Kenneth Klein 

Mayor's Committee Award 
Barry Vogel 

New York State Regents Scholarship 



Charles Adler 
Ronald Bleier 
Mark Diskind 
Harvey Fischer 
Jeffrey Frost 
A Iter Goldstein 
Daniel Greenfeld 
Stanley Gurewitsch 
Simeon Hook 
David Kaplan 



Winners 
Kenneth Klein 
Barry Kopf 
Gary Kravitz 
Bernard Lanter 
David Levine 
Stephen Plotch 
Martin Plotzker 
Kenneth Prager 
Maurice Re if man 



Andrew Reinhard 
Garry Sklar 
Steven Solomon 
Barry Vogel 
Manny Weiss 
Jack Wolf 
*Mitchel Wolf 
Michael Wolff 
Murray Zangen 



*Highest in Kings County, 3rd highest in New York State 
Alternates 



Arthur Alexander 
Murray Hochberg 
Benjamin Hulkower 
Leslie Lipnick 



Manny Meller 
Mark Nadel 
Nathan Rosenblatt 
David Weinstein 



New York State Regents 
Science, Engineering and Mathematics Scholarship 

Winners 
Murray Hochberg Kenneth Prager 
Kenneth Klein Murray Zangen 

Mitchel Wolf 



41 



H 

Q 



FRESHMEN 

BT.A. entrance exams prove too stiff for us 
♦ -we all end up in Y.U.H.S.B. II . . . Soshuk 
swallows nickel — mistaken for candy machine 
. . . Smiling zeros disappear as Melov forsakes 
Y.U.H.S.B. for Middle East . . . 

Prager:"&*''V."V' 

Chuck: ."'?SU' xipfi '?S 
Freshmen take advanced course in permutation 
and combination as Rocky's class becomes Little 
Las Vegas . . . Bob institutes "Open Window" 
policy . . . Musclebound science teacher single- 
handedly crushes cans . . . Soshuk seethes as class 
ties shoelaces in unison (Gober saved) . . . Benjy 
begins four year talkathon . . . "Captain" Gallant 
takes one look at the freshman class and enlists 
in the Foreign Legion . . . Chuck embellishes 
Danny's report card with nine "U" 's and one 
"NT" . . . We get a sneak preview of Bob's mid- 
term: "But what's ALUMINIUM? . . . Dat can 
be kicked around . . . Gorgeous George's helpful 
hints aid bewildered freshies. Ex: Humos remem- 
ber the answer! : Starts with "trans" and ends 
with "piration" . . . You're even dummer than 
the freshies!!!! . . . But Mr. Morse, we-Shaddup! 
. . . Israeli attack on the Sinai Peninsula inspires 
Dooch-Frankel water fight . . . U.N. arbitrates, 
Student Court participates . . . Cool Leon (clap, 
clap) swings with (clap, clap) "Man Has a Soul" 
(clap, clap, clap)— then ducks barrage of pennies 
. . . Ain Peyroosh . . . We are introduced to poetic 
principals as the Rabbi lectures us in dactylic 
hexameter— H^/7.v are you/ not in your/ class 



. singlehandedly 
crushes cans. 




room to/ day! . . . Hunh? . . . Who are the Yugars? 
. . . Bob nearly starves as Shelly patrols halls . . . 
We make up for it in a shower of Hershey Bars in 
last minute bribe attempt — Bob: Which two men 
didn't give? . . . But Mr. Goldstein, his books are 
here . . . Libraries all out of books as we visit the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art vicariously for 
Harry "Herring Bone Tweed" Allan . . . Mr. 
Strum tells Kravitz and company to stop (stretch) 
erupting as we search for the Golden Fleece . . . 
We learn the principles of mechanical drawing 
and mechanics as Mr. Allan monkeys around 
with us and the desks . . . But Mr. Davidson, 
what is a potfer? . . . Ain Peyroosh . . . Smiley 
Melov shows us the "whys and wherefores" of 
diagramming semi-compound fractured, insub- 
ordinate clauses . . . Doc teaches us meaning of 
True Love— 60 and four E's . . . Piller pilfers 
Britannica's information on geography for Puss 
report— gets A Plus for originality . . . 

Chuck: tniffpa is nbav nr nsn 

Piller: .13 
Frankel gives some of us the boot on Fridays- 
has us help Mommy with the Kigel. 



. . . in a manner befitting 
a student of Torah. 



Home Sweet Home. 




SOPHOMORES 

CONGRATULATIONS! Rookie Year's over 
. . . We get Bio: Wtioops! There are sharks 
in these waters . . . Coop cops twolfth place in 
shlope diagramming contest . . . Callan tells us 
H&H stands for helpful hints; but we know better! 
Hie, Hie ... Sol discovers deodorant for gamblers: 
Rollette ... Junior Varsity chosen— 14 playmakers 
and Gary . . . Rosenberg finally hands in "Crushed 
Can" experiment . . . Mayer throws Hochberg out 
for knowing too much: "Tell it to your Mother" 
. . . Water guns "rain" supreme . . . Puss relates 
that he prefers nylon sox to the Red Sox or White 
Sox: They score more runs . . . "Sophist" goes to 
press and stays there . . . "Who is the/ stoodent 
who/ yelled 'Hi-Ho/ SiNerT . . . Hunh? The scep- 
tre is the royal shaft . . . Administration hires 
"new look" faculty: Senor, Simeon, Mayer— total 




1 



age: 342 . . . Spring rolls around and Callan's 
classes switch from indoor to outdoor gym . . . 
Nintch kabob el toro vadiso . . . Rocky mourns 
Dodger departure. 

Schiff: How is fertilization in frogs and human 
similar? 

Berzon: They're both external! 






Up Stairway. 




TTT 



lis 

MB 



mm 









:^ 



Chee, it's good ta see ya. ya cotton pickin', chicken-pluckin', grape-criishin', lead-bellied, eye-gougin', corn chompin', pig-headed, frog-fo 



Reign of Terror begins as the Polar Bear takes 
over the hbrary and turns it into his new head- 
quarters . . . Morse goes wild as we all bring in 
"Under Treatment" notes— we all get tentative 
59's . . . Lippner teaches us how to tour Europe 
on only $207— in 1896 . . . Binky tosses hat into 
ring— permanently . . . We take over Topics . . . 
Members of the Daughters of the Twenty-Sixth 
of July Movement in Mr. Brand's class present 
"Fidel" "s and a "Lambchop" to Brodow . . . 
Monte holds rally for pocket pool team as Simeon 
L. looks gleefully on. Remember, when his glasses 



are on, he can't see, when they're off you're in 
trouble . . . Rules prohibit Simeon from giving 
Mitch what he deserves— 104 ... He settles for 
100 .. . and in everything else too? . . . Callan 
implores us, "Quiet boys. The ol' ticker ain't 
what it used to be" . . . Tex, the guy with the 
ten-gallon sombrero, teaches Isreali culture — 
movie magazines, glamour girls, and the Luba- 
vitcher Rebbi ... all with tongue in cheek . . . 
Brainiest year ends as Mitch pulls 100 average 
and 71 out of 81 of us make Honor Roll, 30 
over 90%-Wha Hoppen? 



Bv the /■<><),/' A vi„)ir ;,./> 





44 





N I O 



Two down and two to go . . . Momentous oc- 
casion, Yock joins faculty, brings valet . . . 
Kenny promises class, "This year won't be like 
last year" . . . heh, heh . . . Nose blows in from 
Cockasmahia-Observer replaces Times . . . Mitch, 
Kenny, Lev, and Mike turn out first Medalist 
Topics . . . We learn in Marty's class that sub- 
gartelian pressures shaped European history . . . 
We use new game to pass Chem. "Slide and 
Peek" . . . Cluck gets smart and pulls surprise 
"quiz" . . . We display "togetherness" by staging 
sit-down experiment 

Students + Pencils + Paper + Questions 
= No Reaction 
It takes two days to help Senor blow out the 
candles on his birthday and another week to help 
him slice and eat it . . . Mike, the world's only 
water-moose elected co-captain of mermen . . . 
Formal T.L.ing begins as January rolls around 
and Benjy finds another hat to throw onto the 



Did I hear what I think I heard? 





pile already in the ring . . . Track Team soars to 
new heights— holds daily practice in Hymie's class 
. . . Cooper definition of inverse variation: As 
noise goes up marks go down . . . Atom Fischer 
edits Flash . . . Henry Higgins Lichtenstein re- 
views Aleph-Bes while teaching French: ahhh not 
A, ay not E, eeee not I, ohh not O, ouuwh not U 



45 



. . . Rubenstein edges Forman as "Coach of the 
Year" . . . Doo Dahh . . . Cluck makes a real 
stink about the hydrogen sulfide experiment . . . 
Senor reports Stern's habitual absences to the 
office . . . Marty Rosen heads Bob's musclebound 
muscleheads for the English Library . . . Doo 
Dahh . . . 

Augie: There was an accident. 

Doc: No you may not. 
Albie discovers you can't cheat on Becker's tests 
—"You're always sitting right under his nose" . . . 
Fire inspectors wonder about all the butts on the 
floor of Room 201 ... Combination (of) lock(s) 
on the Gemorra closet baffles Hymie . . . Senor's 



shave Castro's beard they'll find it was Batista all 
the time" . . . We are injected with Anti-Senioritis 
Serum flown in from Yockville . . . Nose treats 
Myron to one-way ticket to Bloomingdale . . . 
Jonah opens cut-rate shop— receives award from 
Student Betterment League . . . Kenny promises 
class: "Next year won't be hke this year" . . . 
heh, heh . . . We are given sneak preview of 
"Danny Boy" and 30 seconds to keep quiet . . . 
Kravitz obtained for Hochberg — Levine: "Just 
think of what we could get for Botnecht" . . . 
Senor promises to postpone Regents . . . Marty 
snickers at us for the last time . . . and then those 
Regents . . . oooh. 




Shh! Rabbi Heifitz is trying to learn. 



Mishmar Corporation enlarges and includes 
French too . . . Si//omon/ whut were you/ doing 
on top of the/ closet in/ RImm 10/5? . . . Hunh? 
. . . Lev gives up the Track: "It's the only place 
where you can go broke just window shopping" 
. . . "Bunch of Mishagoyim" picket Kenny's 
Kountry Klub . . . Felice Perinoso enters Hall of 
Fame . . . Doo Dahh . . . Senor says: "If they 




Five Regents in three days. 



46 




Heh, heh, heh. 



M. Puss: Pencils down . . . 

M. Plotz:. Simple Simon says . . . 
Rheinbeclc, Rheinstein, Rheinfeld, Rhein-tin-tin 
. . . Right Beer? . . . Wholesale suspensions begin 
as seniors try snow job on the General . . . And 
furthermore ... Of coorse we learn gawblede- 
gook in Econaumics . . . Once, twice, three, shoot 
—Moose is new leader of Arista . . . Pete starts 
out with 1 9 learners— Frost gets first shaft. Green 
talks back, and Krab goes for "unahitel" . . . 
First issue of Topics comes out and Prager be- 
comes number four . . . 

Have Pen 
Will Travel 

Wire Prager Room 201 

Kenny Topsky: If anyone wants to leave— I'll 

write the article. 
Coop: Louis, I hope you fail the Regents. 
Savader: Louis, I hope you get married. 



SENIORS 



Doc swears, "You are not yet seniors" . . . 
Bobylonian Empire reaches new high as 
Security Police is assigned to patrol library . . . 
Big Trade: Marty shipped Uptown for "Handy 
Man" and "Candy Man"— regrettably . . . Getz 
test: True, False. Who Knows, Who Cares . . . 
In Adam Smith's provocative book, history men- 
tor is traced back to James Russell Lowell and 
General Von Sanders . . . min-uuu-tia . . . O 
Danny Boy the pipes, the pipes, are callin' . . . 
twannngg . . . A.N.Z. gets lazy, hires the man 
with the waterproof shirt to patrols the exits . . . 
Inspired seniors reenact the "Wayward Bus" in 
honor of Ben-Gurion . . . 

Benjy: What would you do if I won a Merit? 

Coop: I'd investigate . . . 
Dark Horse Frost surprises all on Advanced Re- 
gents by matching Hochberg . . . Not Nice . . . 
Merit scores announced— Klein and Weiss finally 
stopped . . . "See me in my Cave at 1:00" . . . 



42nd Street and Fifth Avenue 





such a long journey 



MIDDLESTATES: New lab, desks, equipment 
arrive— What's that? Acme Rental Agency . . . 
"Generals" attend Puss's class as Abe mixes extra- 
curricular activities with maneuvers . . . Coop 
asks rough question. Let's call on someone we 
haven't heard from— How about you Kenny? . . . 

On three, whisky, gin. . . . 




Administration elated as Septy pulls successful 
experiment out of the bag . . . Sidney teaches 
Keats, burlesque, and Keats as Middle States 
comes, goes, and returns . . . Coop says, "Mark 
has a problem. Let's see what we can do about 
his problem." Mark faints . . . Abraham (named 
after the greatest trouper of them all) awarded to 
Coop for his outstanding performance . . . Friday 
morning Y.U.H.S.B. turns back into pumpkin 
(lemon?) . . . Physics equipment finally arrives. 



Bowling business declines as school portals are 
closed . . . You intellectual midget . . . Pete 
throws in towel, "elite" get free first period . . . 
Wait till next year . . . New innovation introduced 
by Doc— tests on a study-as-you-go basis . . . 
Seeeted . . . 

Mitch: Rabbi Zuroff, when will we take the 
U.N. exam? 

Rabbi Zuroff: Wolf,/ let me/ tell you we've/ 

already not/ had it . . . Hunh? . . . 




So what? . . . Prager flies back from Washington, 
sees new lab, checks compass . . . Reinhard loses 
history homework— half the class unprepared . . . 
Puss praises his golf prowess. What Putts! . . . 




and Acme Rental Agency on 



Of cuss . . . 

Minnuuutia . . 

Not nice . . . 

And furthermore 




-**- 



Glotzer wins Daily Double at "Big A" . . . C.A.F. 
becomes organization of equine enthusiasts. Track 
events scheduled for Lag B'Omer outing . . . 
N.B.S. sets new sartorial fashion as rebs see red 
at flashy cravats . . . 

Plotzker: Mr. Gold, may I leave the room? My 
pen's leaking. 

Sid: Is that all that is? 
Ten days to go. Only 14 History Assignments, 
3 Eco. Units, and 36 Physics Chapters left . . . 
Take your time . . . June 26— we graduate. Clark 
burns, school returns to normal, and Doc swears 
"You are not yet seniors." 



In terms of the, the 





49 





Left to right: Typing Editors Steven Left to right, Standing: Business Managers M. Bursky, 

Solomon and Martin Agulnek. C. Nussbaum, M. Reifman. Seated: B. Hulkower, J. 

Levenbrown, B. Kopf. 



)( CLCHANPE 





Left to right: Literary Editors Mitchel Wolf, Daniel Greenfeld and 
Stephen Plotch. 



FOLLOWING an unprecedented six straight 
Medalists, the 1960 Elchanite is an ambitious 
attempt to reach a new height in quality for a 
Y.U.H.S.B. yearbook under the leadership of 
Editor-in-Chief Michael Wolff, who co-ordinated 
the staff in its efforts to meet the June deadline. 

The editors of the book, chosen in June, 1959, 
have planned several new innovations which may 
be seen in glancing through the Elchanite. Of 
invaluable assistance was our advisor, Mr. Harry 
Allan who supervised all the various stages of the 
yearbook's production. 

The editors hope that this book will serve as 
a monument to the Encounters and accomplish- 
ments of the Class of '60. 



50 



1 




Left to right: Activities Editors Kenneth Prager, Charles Adler, An- 
drew Reinhard and David Levine. 




Left to right: Editor-in-Chief Michael Wolflf, Advisor Mr. H. Allan, 
Co-Editors Manny Weiss and Kenneth Klein. 





Left to right: Art Editors Stanley Gurewitsch, Murray Zangen, Simeon 
Hook, Co-Editor Manny Weiss. 



Clockwise from top: Photography Editors Jonah 
Botknecht, Larry Waller, Mayer Unterberg and 
Martin Rosen. 



51 





iWam^mim^^j^ 




SPRING TERM 



Left to right, Standing: S. Katz, A. Schnure, J. Flamholz, H. Ishofsky, J. Greenblatt, S. Solomon, 
A. Shapiro, W. Wolff, D. Levine, S. Solomon, M. Diskind, B. Beer, S. Plotch, M. Schoenfeld, 
C. Lopkin, M. Somerstein, W. Nathanson, M. Ness, H. Resnick. Seated: Sec'y W. Reich, 
Advisor Mr. J. Strum, Pres. K. Prager, Vice-Pres. A. Reinhard. 



rOR a school of its size, Y.U.H.S.B. has a dis- 
' proportionately large extra-curricular activities 
program. This is quite fortunate in that it enables 
all those who are interested to participate in any 
of the wide variety of activities offered. Heading 
this program and acting as co-ordinator is the 
student-elected G.O. 

Under the leadership of President Kenneth 
Prager, the club program was revived this year 
on an elective basis. Another high water mark of 
the fall term was the Chanukah Chagiga which 



was under the direction of Vice-President Benja- 
min Hulkower and Larry Waller. Secretary- 
Treasurer Melvyn Barenholz deserves credit for 
editing and typing the G.O. constitution. 

The spring term saw Kenneth Prager re-elected 
to the Presidency. Once again a successful Cha- 
giga highlighted the term. Vice-President An- 
drew Reinhard headed a most efficient Service 
Squad, while Walter Reich brought each student's 
number of service credits up to date. 

Twice during the year, the school was repre- 



52 




sen ted by Prager at important youth conferences. 
In October, the G.O. President attended a New 
York State Youth Conference in Albany where 
he was addressed by Governor Rockefeller. On 
the basis of participation at this conference, 
Prager was selected to represent the Jewish High 
Schools of New York State and Yeshiva Univer- 
sity at the 1960 White House Conference on 
Children and Youth held in Washington, D. C. 
There he was addressed by President Eisenhower 
and other prominent speakers. 

Upon returning, Prager told of his Washington 
visit at an assembly attended by the school's 
upper termers. Among the other assemblies pre- 
sented this term were a basketball rally at the 
opening of the season at which time the team 
performed before the audience; an open G.O. 




Front to back. Left column : H. Resnick, L. Lip- 
nick, J. Mezrich, M. Altner, A. Feuer, S. Plotch, 
M. Hochberg, A. Greenberg, A. Shapiro, H. 
Berenholz. Right column: H. Nathan, I. Horn, 
H. Gralla, W. Reinfeld, I. Reiss, C. Lopkin, J. 
Cohen, L. Waller, S. Solomon, A. Reinhard. 
Center: M. Weiss. 



FALL TERM 





Left to right: Vice President Benjamin Hulkower, Presi- 
dent Kenneth Prager, Advisor Mr. J. Strum. Secretary 
Melvin Barenholz. 



meeting held before the lower termers; an Arista 
Induction Assembly; two pre-election assemblies 
which gave the candidates running for G.O. of- 
fices an opportunity to present their platforms to 
the students; and an Israeli Independence Day 
Assembly. 

A large part of the success of the G.O. this 
year may be attributed to the faculty advisor, Mr. 
Joseph Strum, who contributed the advice and 
service necessary for a well-functioning student 
organization. 





// elected 




54 




SPRING TERM 



Left to right: Mitchel Wolf, Walter Reich, Alternate Martin Agulnek, 
William Wolff, Melvin Barenholz, Chief Justice Mark Diskind. 



THE Student Court, judicial arm of the CO., 
has the job of handling all offenses against 
school regulations. This body, meeting biweekly, 
is composed of four judges, a Chief Justice, and 
an. alternate. 

A student, after he is reported to have com- 
mitted an offense, is brought before the Court. 
Upon hearing the accused's plea and examining 
the particulars of the case, the judges decide 
what punishment, if any, fits the crime. The usual 
punishments are the writing of several disserta- 
tions or a detention. 

The Court was ably advised by the judicious 
Mr. Joseph Strum. 



COURT 



FALL TERM 



Left to right: Harris Berenholz, Walter 
Reich, Steven Solomon, Chief Justice 
Joel Flamholz, Abraham Greenberg, 
Alternate Ira Gober. 




ENJOYING its second year of membership in 
the National Honor Society, Arista had one 
of its most productive years. Besides honoring 
students who have excelled in studies and service, 
the society and its members have tried to display 
leadership in the school and the community. 



Despite the rigid standards employed, the 
honor society, advised by Mr. S. Lebowitz, more 
than doubled its membership this year. After ful- 
filling all the qualifications regarding scholastics 
and leadership, the applicant's character must be 
attested to by both his fellow students and the 



ARISTA 





Left to right. Rear: M. Diskind, D. Kaplan, M. Wolf, B. Vogel. Outer semicircle: A. 
Freedman, S. Plotch, L. Feiner, Leader M. Wolff, Advisor Mr. S. Lebowitz, Vice-Leader 
K. Klein, K. Prager. W. Reich, A. Greenberg. Foreground semicircle: M. Wangrofsky, 
R. Tauber, J. Flamholz, M. Barenholz. 



56 



Clockwise from upper left: G. Abramoff, L. Mufson, W. Wolff, H. 
Berenholz, S. Solomon, C. Horowitz, M. Hocfiberg, Advisor Mr. S. 
Lebowitz, H. Kaufman, G. Wolf, G. Sklar. 




faculty. If, approved, the new member, after re- 
citing an oath in Enghsh and Hebrew, is pre- 
sented with a pin and certificate as toicens of 
acceptance. 

A new and welcome undertaking innovated 
this year by Leader Michael Wolff was the semi- 
annual Arista trip. The society elected to see two 
Broadway shows, "La Plume de Ma Xante" and 



"Greenwillow." In addition to this. Arista con- 
tinued its usual program of helping students with 
their studies. 

Officers elected during the fall term were: 
Michael Wolff, Leader; Kenneth Klein, Vice- 
Leader; Kenneth Prager, Secretary. During the 
spring term the same offices were held by Mitchel 
Wolf, Barry Vogel, and Leonard Feiner. 



57 




VER since its metamorphosis from a photo- 
offset to a printed newspaper seven 
years ago, The Topics has proven to 
be more than just an organ of student 
expression. Published six times during the school 
year, the paper provides many students with the oppor- 
tunity of learning first hand about all 
aspects of journalism— writing, 
editing, composing headlines, 
make-up, layout and typography. 
To insure high journalistic standards. 
The Topics is a member of the Columbia Scholastic 
Press Association which annually rates and 
criticizes the paper. In the results of the 
nationwide contests announced each March to our 
delegates at the annual convention in Columbia University, 
Topics has fared extremely well. During our four 
years, it has been awarded a Medalist rating, two 
first place ratings and an All-Columbian Award 
for features. In addition, the N.Y. Journal- 
American awarded The Topics a plaque for editorials. 
Since its inception, the newspaper has been under the 
wing of Mr. Sidney Gold, faculty advisor. He not only 
supervises the operations before publication but also 
heads a journalism club for budding reporters. 
The popularity of The Topics is a result of the efforts 
of its experienced staff. Mitchel Wolf, during his two years 
as Editor-in-Chief, has followed an editorial policy 
aimed at advancing the causes of the students. 



Left to ii^ht Walter Reich Andrew Reinhard. David Levine, Kenneth Klein. 



GOVERNING 
BOARD 




TOPICS 



MANAGING BOARD 





Left to right: Harold Peine, David Herman, Martin Agulnek, Arthur 
Alexander, Joel Flamholz. 



Left to right: Editor-in-Chief Mitchel Wolf, Advisor Mr. S. 
Gold, Managing Editor Kenneth Prager. 



Meet the Faculty, a very popular feature, has been 
expertly handled by Kenny Prager for the past two 
years, while The Wolff's Den, originated by 
Michael Wolff and Mitchel Wolf, has been ably 
continued by Mike and his brother Billy. Dave 
Levine, with four years of experience on the 
paper, has been in charge of the news department 
for two years, and Andy Reinhard, Sports Editor 
has continued the popularity of Sports Slants. 
Once a year, the editors neglect the sober facts 
and publish a hilarious Purim issue. 




59 





Left to right: Co-Editors A. Freedman, A. Greenberg, Advisor Rabbi J. 
Epstein, K. Prager, M. Greenberg. 



60 




NOW in its twelfth year of publication, 
Kolenu, our Hebrew literary annual, has 
met with great success. It has earned wide ac- 
claim in Jewish literary circles throughout the 
country, and was awarded a First Place rating by 
the Columbia Scholastic Press Association this 
year. 

The range of material encompasses everything 
from classical studies to modern Hebrew. Orig- 
inality and personal experience are stressed; 
therefore, in place of a central theme, each par- 
ticipant writes on the topic closest to him. In 
addition, interviews and articles on school activi- 
ties appear. 

Rabbi Joseph Epstein, faculty advisor, is great- 
ly responsible for the increasing popularity and 
success of Kolenu. His expert guidance has led 
to a larger, improved Kolenu, and has effected a 
great rise in student participation and interest. 




SINCE its inception five years ago as a supple- 
ment to The Topics, the mimeographed Bulle- 
tin has grown both in scope and frequency and 
is now a recognized publication in its own right. 
This year, edited by Harvey Fischer, The Bulletin 
underwent several improvements. A Managing 
Editor, Charles Adler, was appointed for the first 
time, to help publish a neater, more readable 
journal; editorials and features appeared dealing 
with out-of-school topics such as religious com- 
munity life and youth conferences; top-ranking 
seniors wrote articles giving advice to underclass- 
men about scholarship and College Board exams. 
Working with the efficiency of a practiced 
team. The Bulletin staff published a record thirty 
issues this year, many of them three page edi- 
tions. Next year, the paper will be entered in 
C.S.P.A. competition. 



Left to right, Standing: M. Agulnek, D. Weinstein, L. Feiner. Seated: G. 
Wolff, C. Adler, Editor-in-Chief H. Fischer. 





•3f 



^ 



•5f 



^ 



V±©IAI 
AT0M 



THE Atom, with the capable assistance of Mr. S. Lebowitz, 
faculty advisor, and the hard work of many science enthus- 
iasts has come into its own as an official Y.U.H.S.B. publica- 
tion. -K" The columns delve into the mysteries of modern 
mathematics, and the world of science — especially nuclear 
energy, while the section on current events help keep the 
students abreast of new developments. ^ Under the editor- 
ship of Warren Goldman, many beneficial changes have been 
made. ■^ More appealing page layouts, columns reaching the 
lower classmen, and interesting art work, have all helped to 
increase student interest. -Jf 



iM 



MATH 
TEAM 





Standing: Advisor Mr. L. Cooper. 
Front to rear, Left column: K. Klein, 
G. Kravitz, M. Hochberg, A. Green- 
berg, L. Feiner, M. Wolf. Right col- 
umn: J. Flamholz, M. Berenholz, B. 
Vogel, D. Kaplan, W. Reich. H. 
Fischer. 






-A i. ®^"^'*t^-'^^^"«*iJ>^^S 






A-/\^ 






J 9ai 



,-^ 



in^«iiUA-A'iri.7S'^AjniilXNl 







ANEW entry to the roster of 
Y.U.H.S.B. extra-curricular activi- 
ties is the recently formed Math Team. 
Competing in the Inter-Scholastic Math 
League, the team, coached by Mr. L. 
Cooper and paced by captain and high- 
scorer Kenneth Klein, compiled a highly 
commendable record in its first year. 

Under league rules, five students are 
chosen to officially compete in each con- 
test, while the remainder of the team uses 
the tests as practice for future competi- 
tion. Each meet consists of difficult prob- 
lems designed to test the solvers' facility 
with mathematical concepts. 

With interest and participation contin- 
ually mounting, the math team looks for- 
ward to an increasingly important place 
in the school's extra-curricular program. 









63 



Y. O. C. 





Left to right, Standing: H. Berenholz. Leaders L. Mufson and G. Pollack, W. Seeve. 
Seated: M. Hochstein, N. Lass, C. Schertz, Advisor Rabbi P. Yogel, H. Peine, L. Lip- 
nick, S. Liker. 




FOUR years ago a central commission was set 
up to organize all the religious activities of 
the yeshiva. Guided by Rabbi P. Yogel, the 
Yeshiva Organization Commission was headed 
this year by Lewis Mufson and Gary Pollack, 
and was comprised of the Minyon, the Mishmar, 
the Kashruth Commission, and the Charity Drive. 
Rain or shine, a group of boys assemble in the 
auditorium, or beth midrash, at approximately 
8:00 every weekday morning. At this Minyon, 
every boy gets an aliyah at least once a month 
and has an opportunity to lead his colleagues in 
prayer. Mufson and Pollack are also the gaboyim, 
advised by Rabbi S. Faivushevitz. After the Min- 
yon, the boys are served a hearty breakfast, free 
of charge, at John's. 



64 



On Thursday evenings groups of talmidim 
gather in Y.U.H.S.B., Rambam and Eitz Chaim 
Yeshivas, and the Young Israel of Eastern Park- 
way to review the Talmud lessons they learned 
during the week. Because of the dispersion of our 
student body over a greater area of Brooklyn, the 
Mishmar has been held in these various institu- 
tions. Each week different roshay yeshivot pre- 
side over the Mishmorim to help perplexed stu- 
dents with their problems. 

Perhaps the greatest undertaking of the Y.O.C. 
is the Kashruth Commission. The job of this 
commission is to make sure that every edible 
product sold in the yeshiva is strictly kosher. In 
order to perform this duty, the commission sends 
out printed questionnaires to various companies 
whose products are under scrutiny, and sub- 
scribes to the Bulletin of the Union of Orthodox 
Rabbonim. 

A major undertaking of the Y.O.C. each year 
is collecting charity for needy causes all over the 
world. A subsidiary of the Yeshiva University 




oo/r 



Charity Drive, our campaign was co-ordinated 
this year by Avi Hochstein. To reach the annual 
goal of $750, each class appoints a Charity Col- 
lector who makes a daily round of the students. 
On Fridays many classes hold auctions of the 
donations of its members to subsidize its contri- 
bution. 





debating 





SPRING TERM 



Left to right. Seated: L. Waller, K. Klein. W. Reich, R. Taiiber, M. Schoenfeld. Standing: 
B. Hulkower, M. Wolf, R. Bleier, Manager H. Fischer, M. Wolff, C. Horowitz, W. Wolff. 




66 




o 




CCUPYING a prominent position among 
the roster of sciiool activities is Y.U.H.S.B.'s 
debating program, botii intramural and inter- 
scholastic. 



'in the school itself, each class has its own debating 

team under the direction of an elected debating 
manager who, together with other class managers, 
and under the supervision of a school debating 
manager, contributes topics for debate, plans re- 
search material, and works out the minor details, 
all of which are essential for a successful intra- 
mural debate. All intramural debates are held 
before one of the classes involved in the contest, 
and are judged by the home team's instructor. 

On the level of interscholastic competition, our 
school forensic squad completed its most success- 
ful season this year. Under the supervision of 
Harvey Fischer and Larry Waller, fall and spring 
term debating managers, respectively, the de- 
bating team went almost undefeated for its entire 
season, compiling an unparalleled 6-1 record. 



k/tlSi 




FALL TERM 



Left to right: M. Wolff, K. Klein, M. 
Wolf, B. Hulkower, Manager L. Wal- 
ler, W. Reich, R. Tauber, K. Prager, 
M. Schiff. 




67 



■Hia 





Center: Leader L. Waller. Left to right: H. Kaufman, G. Listokin, I. Rapaport, M. Schoenfeld, 
J. Berlin, G. Wolf, M. Schiff, J. Wolf, M. Sperling, M. Wolf, J. Frost, M. Diskind, C. Nussbaum. 



Left to right: I. Gober, A. Perkal, W. Kerness, Leader B. 
Hulkower, M. Durst, K. Bernstein, C. Horowitz. 




VARIETY NITE 





Left to right: 

Kenny Prager, Mark Diskind, 

Mitch Wolf, Maurice Reifman. 




VARIET 




PROFESSIONAL entertainment, interspersed 
witii an array of talent from our own stu- 
dents, made Variety Nite 1960, held in the ultra- 
modern George Wingate Auditorium, a rousing 
success. 

"There's No Business Like Show Business" 
was the theme followed throughout, as leaders 
Benjy Bulkower and Larry Waller directed a 
smooth, impressive production. M.C. for the oc- 
casion was Joe Lauer, President of the Young 
Israel Intermediate Council. Larry Arberman, an 
alumnus of Y.U.H.S.B., provided a hilarious 
touch to the proceedings with his comedy; Her- 
bert Greenspan excited the audience with his 
sleight-of-hand feats; and an Israeli dance group 
executed modern Israeli dance steps. 

Amateur entertainment was provided by the 
school Glee Club, which sang a medley of show 
tunes accompanied by the school band. Wayne 
Kerness and Kenny Bernstein presented a guitar 
duo, while two quartets harmonized popular Eng- 
lish and Hebrew tunes. An amusing interlude 
consisted of a "Man on the Street" interview. 

The proceeds from the show went to the G.O. 
and constituted a major portion of the yearly 
income. 



69 



Sandwiching Salami 



7 V 



A d'var Torah 




Chomp, slurp, burp, ahhh 



kJ 



^ 



E^ 



CHANUKAH and Purim are two of the most 
joyous Jewish festivals celebrated in the 
course of the year. One of the manifestations of 
the festive spirit pervading the atmosphere during 
these holidays is the Chagiga program consisting 
of satiric skits, perennial poems, holiday singing, 
music, and an address on some relevant topic by 
one of the school's Talmud instructors. 

The Chanukah Chagiga, under the direction 
of Larry Waller and featuring the Ben-Carmi 
Combo, was remembered for the sketch of school 
life entitled "Fix Tac Dough:" a quiz show fea- 
turing school instructors in the roles of befuddled 
contestants. 




Led once again by Waller and presented amid 
colorful decorations, the Purim Chagiga was re- 
ceived as enthusiastically as its predecessor. "Find 
My Line," the eagerly-awaited Chagiga skit, por- 
trayed several mentors as panelists inquiring into 
the occupations of their beatnik, yarmulka-knit- 
ting, and "guidance counselor" colleagues. 

The success of the two Chagigas may be attri- 
buted to the teamwork of several students, an 
interplay of whose talents resulted in the timely 
decorations, appetizing meals, hilarious skits, and 
entertaining music present at the Chagigas. 




He is my counselor 



71 



LIBRARY 





CONSISTING of over 4000 volumes, the 
Hebrew Library is the source of all Tal- 
mudic and Hebraic research carried on by 
students and teachers. A great boon to, and 
constantly in use by the rabbis during the 
morning sessions, who make use of commen- 
taries on the Bible and Talmud, the books are 
also read by many students, as they also in- 
clude Hebrew translations of the classics of 
the world, and mathematical and scientific 
tracts. 

Operating under the guidance of Rabbi 
Joseph Epstein, who devised the method of 
classifying Hebrew works, and head librarian 
Jeffrey Frost, the library reached a peak in 
efficiency and usage. 



Hebrew/ 







^^^^^Hj 


^V^i^9B^^fi^R 






I^^HHB 




pniMHi 


^B /iUB ^1 


n 


MBll^K 






!iw' 




N 




Qm m 


m y 




:- 1 1 J :S: ~ 








BB 1 w 1^1 


Hi 1 


11 8 


vIM 




■ 




r Htfl Wl 


gi 


his 




m 


Mm 


ifflliH 





Left to right: A. Spiegal, Advisor Rabbi J. Epstein, Chief 
Librarian J. Frost, M. Greenberg, P. Sass, N. Wasserstrum. 



72 




AT the beginning of the year the English 
Library boasted a reference section con- 
sisting of twenty-one complete encyclopedias, 
four book digests, and twenty lexicons in five 
languages, many best sellers, and a large 
catalogue of math, science, and history books. 
To the librarians' delight and surprise the 
library suddenly acquired several hundred 
new volumes, of which over one hundred 
were in the math and science fields. New 
dictionaries, fiction, anthologies of plays, 
poems, and short stories, and six new maga- 
zine subscriptions were added. 

The response to the improved quality and 
quantity of books plus the publication of a 
larger and better "Library Journal" has been 
1 the record breaking number of books bor- 
rowed. 

Capably supervising all activities is Mr. 
Robert Bassell. 




English 








Left to right: Advisor Mr. R. Bassell, Security Chief M. 
Rosen, Chief Librarian D. Rhine, J. Ganchrow, J. Bunin, 
H. Meyerwitz, B. Chwat, I. Reiss, L. Chapman. 




73 




SERVICE 



SPRING TERM 



Left to right. Front row: J. Kovin. H. Nathan, H. Resnick, B. Furmansky, H. Spilke, S. Bienen- 
stock, N. Sanders. Second row: J. Wolff, S. Hook, Captains I. Gober and M. Nadel, J. Bot- 
knecht, D. Weinstein. Third row: R. Druckman, J. Berlin. F. Haller, A. Weinberg, H. Bern- 
stein, A. Bender, G. Wolf, N. Ringel, W. Reinfeld, Fourth row: H. Bachman, V. Katz, M. 
Altner, J. Whiteman, B. Marinbach, J. Bruger, W. Werblowsky. 



THE duties of the Service Squad, disciplinary 
force of the school, are to ensure proper de- 
corum, help keep the school clean and, if need 
be, arrest wrongdoers. It executes these functions 
in conjunction with the Student Court, which 



Mr. Sokolov 




rrn 
crrr 

if 



'r I 






74 



"S 



SQUAD 



renders judgment on students who have violated 
school regulations. 

The squad is picked proportionally from each 
class at the beginning of each term after a series 
of impartial interviews held by the officers. 

The spring term saw a new innovation added 
to the Service Squad, a faculty advisor. Acting in 
this capacity was Mr. A. Sokolow who guided 
the Service Squad towards a new peak of effi- 
ciency. 

The fall term saw Manny Wiess and Andrew 
Reinhard acting as captains with M. Hochberg, 
C. Nussbaum and D. Rhine as their lieutenants. 
Mark Nadel and Ira Gober were spring term 
captains with J. Botknecht, S. Hook, D. Wein- 
stein and J. Wolf serving as assistants. 



FALL TERM 




Left to right. Front row: M. Greenberg, M. Elbogen. A. Perkal, R. Frackman, J. Cohen, M. Ness. 
Second row: L. Pearson, F. Haimm, C. Nussbaum, Captains A. Reinhard and M. Weiss, M. 
Hochberg, D. Rhine, S. Weissman, M. Sabel. Third row: K. Kaplan, C. Lopkin, A. Lacher, 
J. Cohen, F. Fisch, J. Berenholz, S. Solomon, M. Hudes, H. Ishofsky, S. Rosner. Fourth row: 
K. Grossman, E. Weinraub, P. Sass, I. Horn, W, Werblowsky, N. Lass, W. Goldberg, A. Schnure, 
J. Mahler. 



75 




IT is by no means unusual to walk through the 
halls of Y.U.H.S.B. and notice groups of boys 
surrounding any one of four chessboards, atten- 
tively watching every move. With such student 
interest, it is easy to understand the success of 
the Chess Team in competition. 

The team's meets are scheduled and co-ordi- 
nated by the Inter- Yeshiva High School Student 
Council which includes the major yeshiva high 
schools in the Metropolitan area. Mark Diskind 
and Michael Handelsman, both compiling a 4-1 
record, sparked the chessmen. 




Left to right: Charles Adler, Murray Hochberg, Mark Oiskind. Michael Handelsman, Captain 
Martin Feldman. 




76 



dam 






SKETBALL 




Left: Coach Irv Forman. Left to right. Front row. Scorer B. Beer, Manager J. Botknecht, 
Assistant Manager W. Goldberg. Second row: B. Steiglitz, M. Wolff. D. Levine. K. Prager, 
G. Wolff, S. Hook. Third row: Timer M. Zangen, N. Ringel. P. Horowitz, J. Strauch, L. 
Garber, W. Werblowsky, Athletic Manager M. Sperling. 




78 



LEADING SCORERS 

Prager 213 

Ringel 179 

Garber 177 

Steiglitz 156 

Levine 87 

Wolff, G. 60 



SEASON'S RECORD 




37 


Y.U.H.S.* 


34 


77 


Alumni* 


41 


52 


H.I.L.I. 


31 


56 


R.J.J. 


50 


65 


Flatbush 


55 


61 


Ramaz 


56 


60 


H.I.L.I. 


43 


68 


Brooklyn Friends** 


64 


63 


New York Friends** 


74 


55 


R.J.J. 


53 


59 


Flatbush 


60 


44 


Ramaz 


48 


59 


Brooklyn Friends** 


64 


50 


Y.U.H.S. 


36 


50 


R.J.J.*** 


67 


856 


776 


* 


Exhibition Game 




** 


Non-League Game 




«* 


*Playoflf Game 






Y' U.H.S.B.'s Varsity got off to an auspicious 
♦ start this season by upsetting Y.U.H.S. in 
Madison Square Garden, giving Y.U.H.S. its first 
defeat on the Garden floor. This was the initial 
game of six consecutive victories for the Yugars. 



By the time league play had ended, an impressive 
7-3 record had been compiled and the team 
found itself the sole possessor of second place in 
the Metropolitan Jewish High School League 
standings. 



79 



Among the high points of season play were 
the only two victories scored by any team over 
Y.U.H.S. in league play, and a thrilling overtime 
non-league defeat of a strong Brooklyn Friends 
team. 

Responsible for the team's high league stand- 
ing was Coach Irv Forman, who used the 
M.J.H.S.L.'s only man-to-man defense and one- 
three-one zone offense to good advantage. Co- 
Captains Dave Levine and Kenny Prager pro- 
vided the squad with strong rebounding and 




Left to right: Captain Dave Levine, Coach Irving Forman, 
Captain Kenny Prager. 



^VWlllIllliiii, 




defense, while Norman Ringel and Gary Wolff 
contributed their excellent shooting ability to the 
team's effort. Speed and ball-hawking were of- 
fered in the play of Laurie Gariber and Barry 
Steiglitz. 

The Yugars' four representatives to the All- 
Star Team were Laurie Garber, awared the Most 
Valuable Player trophy, Dave Devine, Kenny 
Prager, and Gary Wolff. 



80 



V. J. V. J. V. J. V. 




V. J. V. J. V. J. V. J. V. J. V. J. V. 



From lop, Left arm: F. Haimm, S. Sherman 
J. Lewinger, Right arm: A. Zuckerman, M 
Hudes, F. Haller. From Top: Base, H. Bach 
man, J. Kovin, M. Levine, S. Amigo. 



TRAINING ground for future Varsity stars, 
the Junior Varsity provides needed experience 
for hopeful hoopsters. During the year, a much 
needed J.V. Basketball League was formed. The 
team, under the tutelage of senior Morris Ruben- 
stein and alumnus Michael Ostrow, had a fairly 
successful season, winding up with a 4-4 record. 
Outstanding among these under-classmen were 
sophomores J. Kovin and F. Haimm, and fresh- 
man H. Bachman. 

The outlook for the team is bright, with several 
freshmen developing into fine prospects. 



81 




Swimming 








Left to right: Capts. M. Wolff and C. Nussbaum, W. Wolff, J. Frost. A. Alexander, F. Haimm, 
M. Zangen, C. Adler, H. Gralla, M. Barenholz, F. Rosen. 



AFTER two years of intensive training under 
the siiarp eyes of Coach Lee Leibrock, the 
swimming team, led by Captains Michael Wolff 
and Charles Nussbaum, has gained the coveted 
Championship Trophy of the Inter-Yeshiva High 
School League. 

Starting the season with a smashing win over 
R.J. J., defending champions, by taking every 
event save one, the team went on to swamp 
Y.U.H.S. and Flatbush by taking every event. 
After these overwhelming victories the team be- 
gan to take it easy but were shocked into serious 
action by a 33-31 defeat suffered at the hands of 
an improved R.J.J, squad, and a sudden change 



Left to right: Captains Charlie Nussbaum and Mike Wolff, 
Coach Lee Leibrock. 



82 





of the scoring system by the I.Y. Executive 
Council, without explanation. 

Knuckling down to business, the team again 
smashed Y.U.H.S. and Flatbush, dropping one 
event. Then, on May 16, at the first meet held at 
our home pool ( all previous meets had been held 
at R.J.J.'s pool), the team showed its mettle by 
routing R.J. J., taking all events but one. 

In the course of the year the medley relay, 
consisting of backstroker M. Wolff, breaststroker 
C. Adler, and freestyler F. Haimm, and the free- 
style relay with C. Nussbaum, H. Gralla, P., 
Haimm, and M. Zangen went undefeated. Also 
conspicuous for their performances were K. 
Prager and W. Wolff. 



83 



^owlJ/uj 



Two years after its inception, tiie Bowling 
Team has finally been recognized by both the 
G.O. and the Inter-Yeshiva Student Council. This 
year the team has had seven matches, five of 
which were under the aegis of the Inter-Yeshiva 
Student Council. 

The team, captained by Martin Agulnek, com- 
piled a 6-1 record, and won the League Cham- 
pionship. Outstanding players for the team this 
year were Jonah Botknecht, Martin Agulnek 
and Gary Wolff. 




Leit to right, Fourth row: Capt. M. Agulnek, 
S. Solomon, G. Wolff, D. Kaplan. Third row: 
M. Plotzker, M. Sperling, L. Waller. Second 
row: M. Zangen, J. Botknecht. Foregound: 
L. Glotzer. 




SfiPiMumk 



INTRAMURAL sports, forming an important 
part of our athletic program, provide the 
average student with a chance to participate and 
show his ability in a variety of sports. 

Coordinated by both the fall and spring term 
athletic managers, tournaments were held in 
basketball, table tennis, and softball. Victorious 
in basketball was class 8B, while Moishe Pianko 
and Favi Haimm excelled in ping-pong. At the 
Lag B'Omer outing held on May 16, the softball 
finals were held. 



84 




IJlEfVvuB! 



E 



85 



j^^^^^W 




HEROIC ENCOUNTER 



I S the time of man without a future? 

Is man the sum of what he has? 

Does man think in vacuo, continually becoming present? 

It seems that man does not come up for inspection at each moment, 
to be measured and balanced in terms of what he has. Man does not 
think in the present of the present, deprived of potentiality and 
explained only by what he is. His consciousness, his reasoning, is 
defined as being projected into the future in the present, thus project- 
ing him and his essence and his worth into that future where he can 
be assessed at full value, measuring the potentialities, the powerful 
possible, the tremendous and cataclysmic consequences of that future 
which is present even now and which makes up the Essential Man. 

Man, therefore, finds his battles in the continual present, fighting 
to become the future already preordained by the consciousness which 
predicts and commissions it to become, to be always becoming. 

Man, therefore, is the sum of what he does not yet have — of what 
he could have. 

The Heroic Encounter, therefore, is the clash of reality and po- 
tentiality, both contributing not an excess of memories which can be 
considered a man's totality, but the hope and desire to gain the 
reductio ad absurdum of all human experience. 

Walter Reich 






Ah, yes, Flanagan was the champion, 
a giant amongst men 
a grand old Irish gentleman 
whose strength equalled that of ten. 

From far and wide, across the sea 
they came from every land, 
from north and south and east and west 
they came to shake his hand. 

A great and mighty man was he 
a gallant head held high 
an ocean teeming of brutal strength 
a torch that lit the sky. 

And then nigh but a year ago 
at the end o' that fateful day 
a night so dark ye could not see 
yer hand two feet away. 

The champ was sittin in the pub, 
drinkin a glass o ale, 
jokin' around with all a his friends 
when we heard that horrible wail. 

Aye, the noise of the supernatural 
a noise so strange and weird, 
a noise that made each gray-white hair 
stand up in Casey's beard. 

And all set froze and could not move, 
Aye, all sat there but one. 
One great Irish gentleman 
this weird noise did he shun. 



^0 




FLANAGAN 



e# 



<2i^ Wpsr r*t££ * A- 













f 





He stood right up, his full six-four 
and lowered his head so large 
his eyes became fearful pits of flame 
and out of the door did he charge. 



Then all was quiet and all was calm 
as we gazed out into the street 
not a soul was there to our despair 
no Flanagan there to meet. 



And then a fight in the black night 
that shattered the stillness so frightening 
a screeching noise of straining muscle 
a night filled with thunder and lightning. 



A nd they say on a night so dark and fierce 

you can hear that noise again 

an' ye can feel the tramp of the great olo' champ— 

our champion. Flanagan. 

Jack Wolf 




FOR fifty years he hadn't left the shack. During 
the past fifteen, he had remained motionless, 
eating practically nothing, moving only his eyes. 
When they tried to make him get up, he would 
scream as if they were killing him, so they al- 
lowed him to remain in bed, breaking the 
monotony only to wash him, to change the linen 
and to turn the mattress. Soon they lost interest 
and stopped coming. 

A lad of sixteen stayed with the old man in 
the shack to feed and take care of him. The re- 
cluse would swallow nothing but raw fish and an 



occasional glass of water. What passed in this 
man's uncanny mind? Was he dreaming sadly of 
events long past and dead? Or was his memory 
stagnant as if his nerve had been severed from 
his brain? He remained a silent mystery. 

Years passed. The lad, now about twenty- 
three, was seen in town the first of every month 
obtaining supplies. He would then quickly depart, 
not to be seen for yet another month. The towns- 
people wondered about the little shack on the 
hill but none cared to look into it and, I daresay, 
some were frightened. 




One month, the lad didn't come to town, but 
no one noticed his absence. Five months flew by 
with no sign of the lad. By then the whole town 
was wondering as to the whereabouts of this 
strange boy, but they were strangely appalled 
with the mere mention of investigating the mat- 
ter. No one did anything except to occasionally 
venture a guess, and for the most part, a feeling 



ing a young boy appeared in town. While he was 
registering at the hotel, a talkative clerk told him 
of the little shack on the hill. The boy listened 
intently, nodding with a faraway look at every 
pause. 

That night, the boy left the hotel and set out 
towards the shack. The rain was still falling and 
the constant drip-drop created a rhythm of tedi- 
ous monotony that banged within the boy's head 
and made his feet drag through muddy grime. As 
he reached the hill and started upwards, he 
seemed casual and unafraid as though expecting 
to meet his fate at the top, and could do nothing 
but yield. The boy climbed higher, relentlessly, 
as if an invisible dragon was steadily sucking him 
into its yawning jaws. Reaching the cabin door, 
he hesitated momentarily and glanced furtively 
at his feet. He wanted desperately to run back, 
but the unknown pull which had magnetically 
encased his body and soul persisted and he 
stepped in. The shack was completely darkened. 
He struck a match and an image appeared on the 
floor, but a gust of wind like some slow nocturnal 
force, swept over the grave and struck ominously 
with its chilly breath extinguishing the feeble 
flame. 

The wind subsided, and after striking another 
match, the boy advanced further into the room. 
He saw the image clearly now; it was a bed, and 
on it lay a motionless body. "The old man must 
be dead at last," thought the boy. Suddenly, 
blind terror struck him . . . The eyes. The eyes 
of the body. They were moving. It was alive. He 
looked away. Then a profound realization 
dawned upon him and he again looked at the 
body. This was not the withering figure of an 
underfed old man. It looked rather young— about 
thirty or the mid-twenties. 



of discomfort beclouded any discussion about 


On the first of April, a young boy of about 




the httle shack on the hill. 


sixteen was seen in town. He purchased some 




Then came that fateful day in March— that 


supplies and departed. 




terrible, dismal, rainy day. On that dreary morn- 


Mark Nadel 


89 



THE WORLD 



death praised: gallant knight of relief. 

gallant knight, remover of suffering. 
a bold knight in black armor 
killing the cowardous shining ones, 
the so called white armored knights, 
deceivers all! 

death kills those "hollow men;" 
he rids the worlds of its fakers; 
it seems only death is sincere, 
death hated: knight indeed, but nearsighted. 

in his attempts, to rid the world of 

its scum, 
to rid it of its beguilers 
he misses, he mistakes, he ruins, 
(love— until death do us part) 
how beautiful death would be if he wore 
glasses. 

Sami Rosenberg 



90 




THE JOY OF GIVING 



/ think of all the friends I have. 

And in their hearts how well I see 

Their fears, their hopes, and even tears. 

Keeping loneliness away from me. 

But if a lonely man you may cha'we to meet, 

A stranger in a lonely place. 

Then come with me and question not. 

The logic of thy creator. 

Help is pent up with thine heart. 

An inborn nature of man. 

Deal kindly and lovingly v.'ith those about you. 

And do your most, while you can. 

For this above brings meaning to. 

This wretched life on earth, 

Happy is he who brings joy to others, 

A heavenly existence of knowledge and mirth. 

It matters not how much you do. 

Just try to do your best, 

Just try to give and not receive, 

And you'll be blessed with rest. 

Not all of us will be remembered, many years 

from now. 
At best, only a name in a dusty book. 
The lifeless record of man. 
In your short existence, establish something 

eternal, something greater than fame. 
If life holds sadness for you, there is no one to 

blame. 

Joel Kestenbaum 



BILLY 







IN perennially sunny California a small boy 
packs; why? Little Billy Peterson, a five year 
old boy woke up at nine o'clock; he always 
woke up at nine o'clock, but today it was differ- 
ent—today the world would end. Little Billy 
packed his clothes, his toys and his teddy bear. 
They wouldn't have them in heaven. He was 
positive he was going to heaven because his 
mother had told him that all httle boys named 
Billy go to heaven. Billy would miss his father; 
he would miss the pungent aroma of tobacco- 
even the resounding sting on the posterior from 
a disapproving hand— but those were G-d's ways; 
his father's name was Harry and only Billy's went 
to heaven. 

How did Billy know that the world will end 
today? He woke up in the night and the sky was 
falling. He wasn't afraid. "Those were G-d's 
ways," he said. Now in the morning half of the 



sky lay on the ground and the other half was 
still falling. He put on his coat and started to 
walk out of the house. 

He stopped. Maybe G-d wouldn't believe his 
name was Billy? He frantically ran back to his 
room and after fifteen anxious minutes of des- 
perate searching he found his birth certificate. 
Suddenly he felt horrible. A pulsating pain 
worked itself up from his stomach to the pit of 
his throat. His name wasn't Billy; it was William. 
He would go to hell; he would burn. Billy started 
to scream when he visualized himself turning on 
a spit like a suckling pig. He ran to his bed and 
cried, each sob growing louder and louder. 

The convulsive whimpering awoke his father. 
Mr. Peterson ran over to Billy and without ask- 
ing any questions, gently wiped away the tears 
with a ready handkerchief and said, "If you stop 
crying we'll go outside and build a snowman." 

Sami Rosenberg 



91 




Asceticism 



Poem 



Everything stripped, it is, everything freed; 
the soul aflame, it is, the soul 
Symphonically cacophonous, 

Basic in its beauty, elastic in its discord: 
the intellect erupting almost tranquilly. 
Always truthfully, but swaying 



Deep are the roots of metaphysical thought, 

Far from the realm of reality placed, 

Left to the few who inobscurity delve. 

And find an eternal spirit in the corporeal race. 

Age withers not the ethereal spirit; 

To the scholar it is eternally left, 

To bathe in the waters of everlasting bliss. 

To satisfy the innate heavenly gift. 

The world sees only the ephemeral values, 
Those which destroy both self and one's soul. 
Little do they know of a better tomorrow, 
One in which they will have little to show. 

Many are the pleasures to which one is prone. 

But hedonism no true reward will show 

For only through abstinence true reward may 

one find. 
To recognize in man the pristine, heavenly 

design. 

Barry Vogel 



To the unpremeditated hypnosis of thought; 
acted upon by purity not restrained 
By the fused leashes of buried people. 

Poem is a holy pandemonium of sophisms, 
Poem is the battle-field of the passions. 
Poem is the naked conscience. 

Walter Reich 



92 



Fredrick Charles Hopkins sat down 

in a candy store 

in Georgia 

in this day and age 

and he was neglected. 

He was neglected because he was black 
He was black before he entered this world 
And he will be black when he departs for the 
next. 



fighting for his country 

The United States of America. 

He did not go to College and he 
never lived to see a voting booth. 

At the Draft Board they told him 

you must fight 

to keep the world free 

and to further democracy. 




Fredrick Charles Hopkins has money that is 

green 
Samuel Litton has money that is green, 

but he is white 
Samuel Litton drinks his coke and leaves, 
Fredrick Charles Hopkins is still neglected. 

Fredrick Charles Hopkins does not hate Litton 
Samuel Litton hates Charles Hopkins because: 
he wants to protect his kid sister, 
because his father hates Charles Hopkins 
and because he is ignorant. 

Fredrick Charles Hopkins is twenty-four and 

is a teacher 
He has never voted because he did not know 
Article 20 of the Constitution by heart and 
because he did not know who the postmaster 
general of 
MILTON, GEORGIA was. 

Fredrick Charles Hopkins knew he did not vote 
because he is black. 

Fredrick Charles Hopkins had a brother 

who was killed at 

Iwo Jima 

in the Pacific Ocean 



He did not understand this 
but he died all the same. 

Then he was not inferior 

He could fight next to a white man 

Although he couldn't recite 

THE CONSTITUTION 

he died for it 

the last thing he said was: 

"Fred, I is fighting for you." 

He fought and died and was buried 
with full military honors 
and his grave did not say 
PHILIP HOPKINS, NEGRO 

but rather 

PHILIP HOPKINS, 

UNITED STATES MARINES. 

Fredrick Charles Hopkins did not get his coke 

but he waits 

and he will wait 

because his brother died to further democracy 

and Fredrick Charles Hopkins knows 

that he must live 

to further democracy. 

R. S. Tauber 



93 



I^IM 



The 



VISITORS 



THE rain dripped in iieavy globules outside 
the windows of the candle-lit room. Splashing 
footsteps could be heard approaching the time- 
battered house. The door opened with a despair- 
ing groan and a long file of black-coated visitors 
slowly shuffled into the dusky room, in the center 
of which stood a long narrow table, decked in 
white, here and there spotted with crimson. Upon 
the command of a black mustached man, the 
visitors began taking their seats around the table. 
His whole body trembling, the black mustached 
man took his seat at the head of the table. 

It began immediately. The leader arose, mum- 
bled some introductory words, (which were in- 
coherent from afar) and with a strange look of 
terror and resignation, gulped down a red liquid 
resembling the mysterious spots on the tabletop. 

As the assembly proceeded, the black mus- 
tached man asked for the annual report. All eyes 
focused on a baby-faced, squinty-eyed repre- 
sentative, seated on the far side of the table. He 
stood up, furtively picked up a black book and 
jabbered off some sort of list. As he concluded, 
all the dark, searching eyes turned toward the 
head of the table, as if to hear a reply to the 
discourse. 

Suddenly the sky lit with the jagged brilliance 
of a lightning flash, and a fierce shriek of crash- 
ing thunder deafened the murmuring assembly 
into morbid silence. With this, as though the 



terrifying exhibition of nature's fury was a signal, 
the mustached man reached his trembling hand 
into a square container, and pulled out a rectan- 
gular object with sharp, knife-like points along 
each edge. He then proceeded to slip the rectan- 
gular object into an iron box and lock it. 

In the flickering dimness, a short, stubby arm 
reached out, and. when no one was aware, 
snatched the iron box. Yannkele had stolen the 
Afikomen again. 

Martin Agulnek 





IT was exceptionally hot. The sun pursued me 
without mercy. It was too hot to continue 
planting— yet I had to go on. Around me the 
others worked steadily. We had to finish the 
planting before the sun reached its zenith. The 
entire economy of our border settlement de- 
pended on the produce of these fields. The heat 
of the sun increased. The temperature rose. The 
work continued, but at a slower pace. In the 
distance I could see the bunks glimmering faintly. 
The Shomer stood in the tower, turning 
slowly from side to side; looking for signs of 
Arab Fedayeen. The sun continued to beat down 
and its effects were beginning to show. The work- 
ers" faces were flushed. There was no shelter. 
Occasionally I would glance at the sun. The 



light was blinding. I gulped another mouthful of 
water from my canteen. The tractor was moving 
at an unusually slow pace. The driver was not 
immune from the effects of the sun. I glanced 
upward as the sun moved towards its apex. Ev- 
erything began to appear yellow. Suddenly the 
whistle blew, and the work ended. We picked up 
our equipment and started leaving the field. The 
heat was sweltering. The mountains looked yel- 
low. I covered my eyes and felt my face; it was 
burning. As we reached our bunk, I collapsed 
under the shelter of the porch. Cold water soon 
refreshed me and the heat in my body subsided. 
I looked at the mountains and saw they were 
green once again. In the sky the sun still burned. 
It had reached its pinnacle. I slept. 

Martin Hochstein 



95 




EPIC 

of the Middle States 





JIM 



96 





T^Dym7^sEME^f^s 




97 




IN MEMORIAM 

Her light goeth not out in the night . . . Proverbs 

BEULAH CORN WEBERMAN H'V 

Devoted Mother, Beloved Wife, Adored Wife, 
Cherished Daughter, and Sincere Friend. 

IN LOVING MEMORY 

SAMUEL L. WEBERMAN 

BENJAMIN '60 and HERSHL 





" - ^ 




IN LOVING MEMORY 




of 


IN LOVING MEMORY 


GRANDPA LIPNICK ny 


of our dear 




Father and Grandfather 




NATHAN DENKENSOHN ny 






IN LOVING MEMORY 




of 




SOPHIE DAVERMANN n'y 



Congratulations to 


JACK 


LEVENBROWN 


UPON 


HIS GRADUATION 




from 


MOM 


DAD and IRWIN 




GRANDPA 


J. FELT 


BAKERS EQUIPMENT 


3623 Church Ave. 


35 Mercer St. 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


New York City 


BALSAM FARMS INC. 


MANHATTAN EGG CO. 


88-25 Pitkin Ave. 


349 Greenwich St. 


Ozone Park, N.Y. 


New York City 


K and O BAKERY 


STRONGHOLD FLOUR CO. 


892 Bergen St. 


50 Broadway 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


New York City 


WILLIAM TUCKER 


ZULLER and JACOBY 


101 Maiden Lane 


1258 Flatbush Ave. 


New York City 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


PLYMOUTH ROCK FUEL CORP. SUPREME OIL CO. 


16 Court St. 


51-02 27 St. 


Brooklyn 1, N.Y. 


Long Island City, N.Y. 


EXTRIN FOODS INC. 


ATLANTIC YEAST CO. 


70 Barclay St. 


640 Dean St. 


Nevv York, N.Y. 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


LOUIS HACKMEYER 


MARS FUDGE and FRUIT CO 


179 Essex St. 


21 Rush St. 


New York, N.Y. 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 




■fvWeZt 




99 




Aesop and Grossinger's 

XX n Athenian once found Aesop joining 
merrily in the sports of some children. He ridiculed him 
for his want of gravity. Aesop good-naturedly took up 
a bow, unstrung it, and laid it at the man's feet. "There, 
friend," he said, "that bow, if kept strained all the time, 
would lose its spring and probably snap. Let it go free 
sometime, and it will be fitter for use when it is needed." 
. . . So, take Aesop's wise advice: take it easy; relax; 
enjoy yourself; let yourself go, and have a happy time 
at Grossinger's . . . Don't forget to make good use of that 
new health club here. Take a steam bath; relax in the 
Arizona hot room; get an invigorating massage; sun- 
bathe under the special lamps or get a heat treatment. 
Take a hydrotherapeutic or regular shower. Here's to 
your good health at Grossinger's! 




^yvchz<p^<yt^vaj2^tJo 



HAS EVERYTHING 
GROSSINGER, N. Y. 



100 




Congrafulations and Besf Wishes to 

MICHAEL WOLFF 

MOM, DAD and BILLY 
GRANDPA and GRANDMA 
AUNT GOLDIE and UNCLE JACK 
AUNT PETE and UNCLE CHARLIE 
UNCLE LEO and AUNT SOPHIE 
AUNT BERT and UNCLE LOU 
UNCLE JOE and AUNT CELIA 
AUNT JEAN 

AUNT SOPHIE and UNCLE ABE 
AUNT JENNIE and UNCLE MAX 
and all the COUSINS 






101 




Congrafulations and Best Wishes to 

KENNETH PRAGER 

from 

MOM, DAD and DENNIS 

GRANDMA and AUNT ANNE 

PAPA and BABA 

UNCLE AL and AUNT CHIPPY 

UNCLE BERT and AUNT PEARL 

UNCLE MORRIS and AUNT GERT 

and all the COUSINS 



Congratulations to 

ARTHUR ALEXANDER 

MOM and DAD 

KENNY and ROBIN 

GRANDMA and GRANDPA ALEXANDER 

GRANDMA and GRANDPA ZIVITZ 

AUNT LIBBY and UNCLE HESHY 

and the KIDS 
AUNT JUDY 
NATHAN ALDRICH 
GEORGE MISHIKOFF 
FOLBER LUNCHEONETTE 



LEONARD HAIMES and CO. INC. 
35 Mercer Street 
New York 13.N.Y. 



BAKER'S EQUIPMENT INC. 
35 Mercer Street 
NewYorkl3, N.Y. 




102 



Congratulations to 

STANLEY GUREWITSCH 

from 

MOM and DAD 

BROTHER ARNE 

GRANDMOTHER and GRANDFATHER 




BON VIVANT 
1 350 Broadway 
N.Y.C. 



Congratulations to 

MICHAEL WOLFF 

from 

SIMPLEX PLUMBING CO. 

DR. SIDNEY E. LIGHT 

M. I. GOLDSTEIN and SONS 

BOUND BROOK FARMS 

MILSTEIN'S PHARMACY 

MR. and MRS. I. KAHN 

M & H AUTO REPAIR 

SAM BORDOFF 

BERNIE FERBER 



FRIEDMAN'S SPORTING GOODS 
930 Hatbush Ave. 
Brooklyn 26, N.Y. 




10.'; 



Congratulations to 

MAYER 

from 
MOM and DAD 
TEMA and JACK 
SARA and DAVID 
GRANDPA 

AUNT EVELYN and UNCLE ARTIE 
UNCLE MATHEW 
AUNT RUTH and UNCLE CARL 
AUNT CYNTHIA and UNCLE SHEYER 
MAMA 

AUNT BESS and UNCLE ISAAC 
AUNT ROSE and UNCLE ABE 
AUNT ESTHER and UNCLE JACK 
UNCLE DAVE 
UNCLE AARON 
UNCLE SOLOMON 
UNCLE HERZL 
UNCLE NATHAN 
and all the COUSINS 



Congratulations to 

DAVID BLOOM 

from 

MR. and MRS. I. SCHECHTER 
MR. and MRS. H. SCHECHTER and FAMILY 




104 



Congrafulations to 

HESHY BERENHOLZ 

from 

RABBI and MRS. BERENHOLZ 

YANKEE and GOLDIE 

HYMIE'S FOOD CENTER 

MR. MORRIS MUTTERPERL 

MAX'S FOOD CENTER 

F and G CLEANERS 

MR. and MRS. STERN 

STAR PHARMACY 

THE VARIETY SHOP 

MR. and MRS. ARLUCK and DAUGHTER 

MR. and MRS. LEVY 

ROSS PHARMACY 

MR. and MRS. SOL WEISS 

REV. and MRS. J. BASHKOWITZ 

PHILIP STERN and SONS 



Best Wishes to 

MARK DISKIND 



from 

MOM and DAD 

TEDDY 

AUNT RAY and UNCLE LOU 

AUNT JEANNE and UNCLE GEORGE 

ISIDORE CLOOSNER 

MEAL MART 

THE KRAMERS 

MARKELL SHOE SHOP 




d£S 






105 




Congratulations to 

MARTIN FELDMAN 

Upon His Graduation 

from 
MOM and DAD 
GRANDMA ETTA 
NORMAN and FRIEDA 
and 

THE FAMILY 

MR. and MRS. SAM MYERS 
FIRST LUBINER PROGRESSIVE ASSOCIATION 
BORO FUEL OIL CO. 



Congratulations to 

MYRON BURSKY 

On His Graduation 

MOM and DAD 

GRANDMA 

AUNT DOTTY and UNCLE JOEY 

AUNT TILLIE and UNCLE JOE 

AUNT RUTH and UNCLE JACK 

HERMAN and PHILIP 

GOLDSTEIN'S BAKE SHOP 

JACK ROZMAN-MEATS JACK'S FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

501 7-1 3th Ave. 1306-50thSt. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. Brooklyn, N.Y. 




106 



Congratulations to 

HARVEY FISCHER 

Upon His Graduation 

from 
MOM and DAD 
JOSEF and SHLOMO 
MR. and MRS. MOSES FISCHER 
MR. DAVID OCHS 

MR. and MRS. MORRIS YARMACK and FAMILY 
MR. and MRS. IRVING OCHS and FAMILY 
MR. and MRS. SHNALL and FAMILY 
GOODMAN'S GROCERY STORE 
MR. and MRS. PLAGMAN and FAMILY 
A FRIEND 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to 

JEFFREY 

On His Graduation 

from 

MOM and DAD 

ROCHELLE and STANLEY 

GRANDMA and AUNT ROSE 




107 



Congrafulations and Best Wishes fo 

SIMEON J. HOOK 

from 

MOM, DAD and JUDY 

GRANDMA and GRANDPA 

BUBA FEIT 

AUNT MURIEL and UNCLE HARRY 

AUNT HATTIE and UNCLE DUDLEY 

FRAMNER FAMILY 

HOOK FAMILY 

CHALFIN FOUNDATION 



Congrafulafions fo 

MURRAY HOCHBERG 

from 

HOCHBERG BROS. 
WILLIAM BLOOM ROSEN and SON INC. 

MAYER FOOD PRODUCTS 

LOUVY'S MEHADRIN GLAT KOSHER MEAT 

DAGIM TAHORIM 

ADEIMAN FOODS INC. 

ERBA FOOD PRODUCTS INC. 

SCHETZ'S BAKERY 

MORRIS COHEN 




108 



Congratulations to 

LEWIS JAY MUFSON 

A Future Doctor 

from 

MR. and MRS. M. MUFSON 

DR. and MRS. M. HINTER and FAMILY 

L. TEICH and SONS 

LOUIS SHIFERMAN INC. 

CUTOLO REALTY and INSURANCE 

SAMUEL MERNICK 

VICTOR MERNICK 

BERKLEY GARAGE 




r^^.-Z/i- 



Congratulations 
to 

ANDY 

from 

MOM and DAD 

DAVID and MIKE 

GRANDPA and GRANDMA 

UNCLE LEO and AUNT MIRIAM 

UNCLE HAROLD and AUNT SYLVIA 

UNCLE HENRY and AUNT CAROLYN 

UNCLE NORMAN and AUNT MAXINE 

and COUSINS 




109 



T 



Congrafulaf'ions fo 

GARY POLLACK 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

MOM and DAD 

GLORIA and GEORGE 

AVRUM and CHAYEH 

GRANDMA and GRANDPA 

UNCLE CARL, AUNT HARRIET, MADDY and NIKE 

UNCLE DAVE, AUNT PEARL and MYRON 

UNCLE IRVING and AUNT AUDRY 

RICHARD, MADDY and GERALD 

ELTON ST. POULTRY MARKET WEINSCHEL CO. INC. 

303 Elton Street Insurance Brokers 

Brooklyn 1 00 William St., N. Y. C. 




Congrafulations to 

FRED ROSEN 

Upon His Graduation 

from 
S. BRUSTEIN YARNS 

TOV BAKE SHOP 

DAVID NINKELSTEIN 

STANDARD PAPER BOX CO. 



110 



Congratulations to 

MARTIN ROSEN 

On His Graduation 

from 
MOM, DAD and MYRA 




Congratulations to 

MONTE SPERLING 

from 
MRS. ADA EHRLICH 

MR. and MRS. H. RUDOLPH and FAMILY 
MR. and MRS. B. CHALL and FAMILY 
MR. and MRS. A. FREEDMAN and FAMILY 
MR. and MRS. LOUIS SPERLING and SONS 
KINOR DAVID POULTRY 
HERMAN DAVERMAN 




111 



tA^ 




Congratulations and Best Wishes 
to 

STEVE 

from 

MOM, DAD and JEFFREY 

AUNT ANN 

AUNT ROSE and UNCLE BERNIE 

AUNT RUTH and UNCLE SAM 

DR. HARRY BERKOWITZ and FAMILY 

DR. HARRY REICH and FAMILY 

MR. HARRY NEIBERG and FAMILY 

HONEY PHOTOGRAPHERS 

SID WEINSTEIN and FAMILY 

GUTTERMAN'S INC. 

JEFFER FUNERAL HOME 

A. and S. BUTTON CO. 



Congratulations to 

KALMAN TUCHMAN 

from 
MOM, DAD and ISAAC 
MICHELE NINA UNI 
RHONDA ILENE LORING 
JONATHAN BRADFORD LORING 
FREEDA PHARMACEUTICALS 
Kosher Vitamins 
llOE. 41stSt., N.Y.C. 
JACOB KURZER 

MORRIS ELEFANT 
2 W. 47th Street 

JOSEPH BASS, D.D.S. 
1755 Pitkin Avenue 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 




112 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 

LARRY WALLER 

from 

MOM, DAD and THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

DR. ROSENBAUM and FAMILY 

DITMAS AVE. BAKE SHOP 

UNITED COAT and APRON SUPPLY CO. 

LOR-EVE HAIR STYLIST 

BROOKLYN AUTO SALES 

SPINNELA REALTY CO. 

HOTEL DIPLOMAT 

BLOOM PHARMACY INC. 

HARVEY JEWELERS 

WESTMINSTER FUNERAL HOME 

VIC'S FOOD and VEGETABLES 



Congratulations to 

AL 



from 
MOM and DAD 
GRANDMA and GRANDPA 
AUNT HILDA and UNCLE SOL 
AUNT LILUAN and UNCLE IRV 
AUNT IDA and UNCLE DAVE 
AUNT BETTY and UNCLE HARRY 
JOE and SARAH 
LOU and SARAH 




113 




Congratulations to 

MITCHEL 

from 

MOM, DAD and JERRY 

AUNT ROSE 

AUNT ANN 

UNCLE ARCHIE 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1960 

FROM 

THE PARENTS ASSOCIATION 

MRS. SAMUEL WOLFF President 

MRS. J. BRAVERMAN Vice President 

MRS. E. HOROWITZ Vice President 

MRS. N. COHEN Treasurer 

MRS. D. FLAMHOLTZ Recording Secy. 



114 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1960 

FROM 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S 
ORGANIZATION BROOKLYN DIVISION 

MRS. ABRAHAM S. BURSKY 
President 



Congratulations to 

MURRAY ZANGEN 

from 

HELENE ADLER 

M. S. NEIKIN 

GANZ and RUFF CO. 

SEIDMAN and CO. 

MR. M. DOPPELT 





115 



Congrafulafions fo 


Congratulations fo 


STEPHEN PLOTCH 


SHELLY ROSENBERG 


from 


from 


MR. and MRS. SAM SILBERMAN 


MOM and DAD 


MR. and MRS. SEYMOUR PLOTCH 




MARBORO OPTICIANS 


SISTER SHERRY 


MRS. IRVING PLOTCH and FAMILY 


ISRAEL KOFMAN 


SAM HOLTZMAN 




JACKS SPEC SHOP 


UNCLE LEO and AUNT ESTHER 


ZEMAN'S DEPT. STORE 


UNCLE SHLOIME and AUNT PEARL 


JUNIOR TOWN 






SUPERMARKET HOUSEWARES 


PINE'S WOMEN'S SPORTWEAR 




DR. S. CRANIN 


LOWEN'S BAKE SHOP 


DR. A. CRANIN 


31 1 Rogers Ave. 


PEARL PLOTCH 


Brooklyn 13, N.Y. 


Congratulations to 




BARRY KOPF 


CONGRATULATIONS 


from 


to 


MOM, DAD and BEVERLY 


Our Son 


BABA and GRANNIE 




DAVID LANNER 


GARY 


SIMON SPIRA 






Upon His Graduation 


WILLIE CARD 




HARRY EPSTEIN 






MR. and MRS. OSCAR KRAVITZ 


BRIGHTON FOOD STORES 




WHITE PLAINS WATCH CO. INC. 





116 




DD|[irji 






B» SS ■■ ■■<=!!' 55 aS SB 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to 

JACK WOLF 

from 

JONE DRUGS 

JACOB A. FLUSS 

CLARKSTOWN BUILDING SUPPLY CO. INC 

DR. and MRS. MESSER 

CHARLES FISHERIES 



CONGRATULATIONS 
fo 

MENDY PLOTZKER 

from 

DAD, MOM, MARCIA, KENDY, 
CHAIM and YUSSI 

AUNT MARY and UNCLE ED 

BORO FUEL OIL CO. 

KINOR DAVID MEAT CO. 

BROADWAY TRAVEL & RESORT SERVICE 
1650 Broadway, N.Y.C. 



ap 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to 

DAVID WEINSTEIN 

from 

MOM and DAD 

UNCLE PHIL and AUNT SYLVIA 

MICHELE, RHONDA and LISA 

UNCLE JACK and AUNT MIRIAM 

BARBARA, AVIE and SAUL 

UNCLE BENNY, AUNT FRIEDA and GLORIANNE 

MR. and MRS. CHARLES KLAUGHAUPT 

SCHIOIVITZ BOYS 

CHARLIE STRICK 

STEIN and ELBOGEN 



■■Dn 

i vE m i:§i=J 

ooqdSSo 
cnaBQ 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to Our Son 

MELVIN 

from 

MR. and MRS. JACOB SCHIFF 

BROTHERS GARY and ALEX 

FAMOUS CLEANERS 



ii: 



Congrafulations fo 

DAVID KAPLAN 

from 
ALBERT ISKOVITZ 
EMMET PACKING CO. 
ATLANTIC & PACIFIC and COMCO OIL CO. 

A&S SERVICE STATION 
MID-KINGS CIVIC ASSOCIATION 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to 

STANLEY LIKER 

from 

MOM and DAD 

GRANDPA 

ALAN and GAIL 

UNCLE MORRIS 

UNCLE WILLIE and AUNT EVA 

COUSIN MANNY 

DOCTOR GIBER 

WM'BURG FRUIT EXCHANGE 



THE ARISTA CHAPTER 

of 

THE NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Yeshiva University High School 

of Brooklyn 

Congratulafes 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1960 

OFFICERS - FALL TERM 

Michael V^olff Leader 

Kenneth Klein Vice-Leac/er 

Kenneth Prager Secretary 

OFFICERS - SPRING TERM 

Mitchel Wolf Leader 

Barry Vogel Vice-Leader 

Leonard Feiner Secretary 



THE GENERAL ORGANIZATION 

of 

Yeshiva University High School 

of Brooklyn 

Congraiulaies 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1960 

OFFICERS - FALL TERM 

Kenneth Prager President 

Benjamin Hulkower Vice-President 

Melvin Barenholz Secretary 

OFFICERS - SPRING TERM 

Kenneth Prag er President 

Andrew Re in hard Vice-President 

Walter Reich Secretary 

Mr. Joseph B. Strum, Faculty Advisor 




118 



Congrafulations io 


ALPHA LAMBDA KAPPA 


DAVID ACKERMAN 


congratulates itself 


from 






MITCH WOLF 


MR. and MRS. JULIUS ACKERMAN 




and BROTHER LEON 


BERNIE BEER KENNY PRAGER 


ANN and SAM KRETMAN 






MARK DISKIND MEL SCHIFF 


SARAH, LINDA and ESTER 




EDITH and EGAN SEEBERG 


DANNY GREENFELD MEYER UNTERBERG 


MOLLY and TEDDY ACKERMAN 






BARRY KOPF LARRY WALLER 


BRIGHTON SHOE STORES INC. 




BRIGHTON CLOTHES 


GARY KRAVITZ MANNY WEISS 


Congratulations to 


Congratu/ofions to 


ALTER GOLDSTEIN 


MARTIN AGULNEK 


from 


from 


DR. and MRS. MARVIN S. BLUSH 


MOM, DAD and ARTHUR 


STELLA BERKOWITZ 


GRANDMA and GRANDPA and BUBBIE 


RENEE LYNNE GOLD 


GAIETY MUSIC SHOP 


SCHWARTZ BROS., Memorial Chapel 


LOUIS GERSTMAN, Optician 


MET FOOD STORES 


ROSENTHAL and ZIVITZ, 




Kosher Butchers 




WEISS and SEIDENFELD, Butchers 



JEROME PASSER, D.D.S. 




119 






Congratulations to 


Congratulations to 


KENNETH KLEIN 


BERNARD BEER 


from 


from 


MOM, DAD and EVELYN 


MAX and JOE GROSSBERG 


MRS. HEVESH and BEA 
DR. ABRAHAM GREENBERG 


DR. B. KATZ 


CONSTANT-BAVAL OIL CORP. 


FIRST CONGREGATION ANSHE, SFARD 
of BOROUGH PARK 


CHARLES BIENENSTOCK 




JACK ZWITZ 




Congratulations and Best Wishes to 


Congrofu/otions to 


PHILIP LEVITZ 


JONAH BOTKNECHT 


from 


from 


MOM, DAD and ROSALYN 




GRANDMA and GRANDPA 


MOM, DAD, MICHA 


AUNT FRANCES and UNCLE HARRY 


and 


AUNT JUDY and UNCLE NAT 


THE ENTIRE FAMILY 


DR. and MRS. H. RUCHAMKIN 
3066 Brighton 6 St. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



120 



Congrafulations to 


4 

Congratulations to ^ 


LEIBEL LIPNICK 


BENJAMIN HULKOWER 


from 


from 


UNCLE OSCAR 
AUNT MARIAN 
COUSIN BEBE 


MOM and DAD , 
JOANN and VEL 
NAOMI and LENNIE 


COUSIN SUSAN 


1. FLUHR 


RABBI and MRS. BAUM 


POLLACK'S CLEANERS 


DR. WILLIAM GROISSER 


LOUIS SINGER 


GRANDMA and GRANDPA KEVELSON 


M. BAUMGARTEN FINE FURS 


GRANDMA LIPNICK 

CHARLES LIPNICK 

ANNA LIPNICK 

MARSHALL and HARVEY LIPNICK 


MAUZONE KOSHER POULTRY 
ALBANY ENTERPRISES- 

Leonard Peretz, Representative 
FLOHR'S CROWN HEIGHTS 

HEBREW BOOK STORE 


SHEINDY K. LIPNICK 


MAYER'S FOOD PRODUCTS 


THE NEW BRIGHTON JEWISH CENTER 


BERGER'S FISH MARKET 


Congrafulations to 


Congroto/at/ons fo 


CHARLES NUSSBAUM 


IRA GOBER 


from 


from 


MOM and DAD and FAMILY 


MOM and DAD 


DR. MORTON NUSSBAUM 


MEL, ARNY and FRANKY 


MR. and MRS. SAM E. AARON 


THE WIENERS 


BENJAMIN ELLMAN 


THE LLOYDS 


AL FRANKEL 


AUNT BILLIE and UNCLE AL 


THE ROSEN FAMILY 


KINOR DAVID KOSHER POULTRY 





121 



Congrafulations to 

RONALD BLEIER 

from 

DADDY, GEORGE, PAULINE 

EDDY and FRAN 



Congrafulaiions to 

BARRY VOGEL 

from 
MOTHER and FATHER 
GRANDFATHER and GRANDMOTHER 
MR. and MRS. CHASKEL REISER 
MR. and MRS. IRVING REISER 
HAROLD and ROSLYN 




Congratuiaitons 


(o 


MICKEY'S OLD 


MAN 


(The Great Min 


i) 


Founder of the 




"MICKEY'S OLD MAN CLUB" 


1959-1960 




GARRY 


LAIB 


JACK 


PHIL 


JAY 


STAN 



Congrotu/ofions and Best Wishes to 

GARRY SKLAR 

from 

MOM and DAD 

GRANDPA 

ELAINE SKLAR LINGERIE CO. 
31 East 31 St., New York, N.Y. 

WECHTER FUEL OIL CO. 
453 New Lots Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

WORKER'S DRUG STORE No. 2 
9407 Church Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

I. J. MORRIS, INC. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

46 Greenwich St. 9701 Church Ave. 

Hempstead, L. I. Brooklyn 12, N.Y. 



Compliments of 

B'NAI ISRAEL of LINDEN HEIGHTS 

BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

Dr. Aaron Werthheim Rabbi 

Jock Hilt President 

Joseph Kallman Vice-President 

Harry V/eiss Treosurer 



THE N.B.S. 
Congratulates Itself 



CHUCK 


EL SNORTO 


BINKY 


MITCH 


KAL 


TWERP 


BARRY 


MOOSE 


AVIE 


DANNY 


MENDY 


KRAB 


GENERAL 


DISH 


HESHY 


BUTCH 



122 



Congrafulations and Best Wishes 
to 

GARY WOLFF 

from 
MOM, DAD and HARRIET 
ZEIDI MILDINER 

AUNT CHAVIE and UNCLE ABE 
RONEE, ENID and MARC 
AUNT GUSSIE and UNCLE SAM 
AUNT YETTA and UNCLE LOUIS 
PEARL and HAROLD JACOBS 
LOUIS BARENHOLTZ 
DR. PHILIP COHEN 
CHAS. S. GREENE 
BEN SEGAL 
MITTMAN'S MEATS 




Congrafulations to 

IRVING SHEINMAN 

from 

MARVIN S. BIENENFELD 
HENRY HIRSCH 

KINOR DAVID KOSHER MEATS 
INTERSTATE THREAD CO. 
MARK TROUSER MFG. 
SERVICE KNITTING MILLS 
BARNEY UYDUS 



123 




Congraluiations 


Congratuiafions to 


to our son 

MARTIN 

from 


BERNARD LANTER 

from 


MR. and MRS. B. WANGROFSKY 


MOM, DAD, HARRIET and STUART 


MR. and MRS. H. SPIESS 
UNCLE IZZY and TEDDY 
AUNT ETHEL 
GRANDMA 


AUNT ANNA and UNCLE JACK 
AUNT JEAN and UNCLE MORRIS 
UNCLE SAM and AUNT RUTH 


JACK SLACHOFSKY 
FATHER'S FRIENDS 


PADOWER & STEIGMAN INC. 


Congrafu/ofions to 


Congrofu/of/ons fo 


MITCHEL BERZON 


NATHAN ROSENBLATT 


from 


from 


MR. ond MRS. SAMUEL AARON 


MOTHER, DAD and BROTHER 


JACK KAMLER 


KURTZ ond SHNALL PHARMACY 


3053 Bedford Avenue 


DAVES FRUIT MARKET 


Congrofu/ofjons fo 


" -., 


DANNY GREENFELD 

from 
BETH GREENFELD 


Compliments of 

MR. and MRS. LOUIS NESS 
and 


HOROWITZ BROS. & MARGARETEN 


JACK, MELVIN and RONNIE 


A FRIEND 






Congratulations fo 


Congrafu/ofions fo 


HAROLD PEINE 


MANNY 


from 




MOM, DAD, LEAH, ANITA and MIMI 


from 


MR. K. HAMMER 


HARRY WEISS and FAMILY 
MR. and MRS. SAM MEISTER 


JACK YARMUSH-CANDY MACHINES 
JACOFFS BOULEVARD PHARMACY 
DR. E. NATELSON LANGER 




ROBERT and MICHAEL 



124 



Q"»B°1'^I\ 



DR. J. W. CORN 
Oklahoma City 

MARVIN ROTH 

33 South Rd., Harrison, N. Y. 

EMCO BUTTON and NOVELTY SUPPLY 
239 W. 39 St., New York 1 8, N. Y. 

GEORGE MISHIKOFF - INSURANCE 
150 Nassau St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DAIRYCREST ICE CREAM 

921 E. New York Ave., Brooklyn 3, N. Y. 

EMPIRE LIQUOR CORP. 

820 E. 140 St., New York 54, N. Y. 

PAUL HOROWITZ 

1230 48 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MR. and MRS. 
5501 14th Ave 



HERMAN PEARL BUTTON CO. 
416 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

MERMELSTEIN CATERERS INC. 

937 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CO. MR. DAVID SHEINBERG 

260 47 St., Brooklyn 20, N. Y. 

JUNO KNITTING MILLS CO. 

783 Manhattan Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

AVON BELT and TRIMMING CO., INC. 
345 W. 35 St., N. Y. C. 

NU-BORO PARK CLEANERS 
1257-77 39 St., Brooklyn 18, N. Y. 

MANDEL FAMILY 

461 1 12 Ave., Brooklyn 1 9, N. Y. 

BENJAMIN GLOTZER 
, Brooklyn, N.Y. 



D. B. DIE V/ORKS 

THE BIG APPLE 

GLENVILLE and HEGEMAN FARMS 

ERBA FOOD PRODUCTS, INC. 

DR. and MRS. HAROLD Q. LEVINE 

HERMAN CLEANERS 

LEADING CLEANERS 

CRESCENT DELICATESSEN 

M and N APPETIZERS 

B. GORDON MEN'S CLOTHES 

DR. MORTIMER MESSING 

WALDORF SHOE SHOP 

A. J. BANNER, INC. 

JERRY I. KLEINMAN 

YOUNG ISRAEL OF BORO PARK 

STERNBERGER'S POULTRY FARM 

LOUIS CHARNEY GLASS and MIRRORS 

SILVERSTEIN OPTOMETRISTS, INC. 

LANE COSMETICS SHOPPE, INC. 

SCHARF DAIRY - SHOMER SHABBOS 

MARTIN HOCHSTEIN 

UNCLE GEORGE 



NATHAN GANZ and FAMILY 
FOGEL and BROWN FOOD CENTER 
TREADEASY RUGBY SHOE STORE 
SANITARY LAUNDRY 
THALL PLASTIC and METAL CO. 
TYROL SAKS CORP. OIL BURNERS 
TRU-FUEL OIL CO. 
KINOR DAVID KOSHER POULTRY 
HY J. BRANDOFF 
MR. and MRS. J. GREENBERG 
LANE COSMETIC SHOPPE 
HERSHY and PAUL 
JOHN TODARO - OUR LEADER 
LYNN SMITH 
WARREN SHULZBERGER 
BILL AUGUSTINE 
RHODA 
ALICE 
BUNNY 
SHIRLEY 
EVELYN KLEIN 
RUBENS 






A A. 
ON nil 



MM MM BH tflBD 

f 1 fi I 






afsi" 

looan. 



125 






SENIOR 



RECTORY 




r>rtssix^ 



DAVID ACKERMAN. 3033 Coney Island Avenue 
CHARLES ADLER, 500 Sutter Avenue HY 8-3395 
MARTIN AGULNEK, 1050 Ocean Avenue GE 4-5442 
ARTHUR ALEXANDER, 659 Hawthorne Street H Y 3-02 1 5 
BERNARD BEER, 1429-47th Street GE 6-0669 
HARRIS BERENHOLZ, 2877 Brighton 3rd Street DE 2-5 1 20 
MITCHELL BERZON, 1 152 E. 26th Street ES 7-7026 
RONALD BLEIER, 1 140 President Street HY 3-3852 
DAVID BLOOM. 398 Montauk Avenue CL 7-1814 
JONAH BOTKNECHT, 57 LefTerts Avenue BU 4-8238 
MYRON BURSKY, 1446-52nd Street UL 1-7606 
MARK DISKIND, 1224-48th Street UL 4-0796 
HAROLD FEINE, 728 Empire Boulevard PR 8-3687 
MARTIN FELDMAN, 4414-9th Avenue GE 6-4067 
HARVEY FISCHER, 47 Balfour Place HY 3-2203 
JEFFREY FROST, 2271 E. 18th Street NI 6-6067 
EITAN FRYDMAN, 470 Montgomery Street 
LEONARD GLOTZER, 5501- 14th Avenue UL 1-5101 
IRA GOBER, 4600- 1 4th Avenue GE 6-6229 
ALTER GOLDSTEIN, 28 1 Crown Street HY 3-0280 
JACK GREENBLATT, 63 Avenue W ES 2-4856 
DANIEL GREENFELD, 853 Empire Boulevard IN 7-5029 
STANLEY GUREWITSCH, 436 Eastern Parkway IN 7-4079 
MURRAY HOCHBERG, 1 3 10-52nd Street UL 1-7684 
MARTIN HOCHSTEIN, 1800 Ocean Parkway NI 5-0979 



126 




SIDNEY HOOK, 1 664-47th Street UL 1-8488 
SIMEON HOOK, 1543-48th Street GE 6-8968 
PAUL HOROWITZ, 1230-48th Street UL 3-8034 
BENJAMIN HULKOWER, 609 Empire Boulevard PR 4-0063 
DAVID KAPLAN, 577 Midwood Street PR 4-8365 
KENNETH KLEIN. 1 146 E. 14th Street CL 8-6742 
BARRY KOPF, 2229 Knapp Street SH 3-9203 
GARY KRAVITZ, 5602 Beverly Road GL 1-0337 
BERNARD LANTER, 5501-14th Street UL 1-9285 
JACK LEVENBROWN, 1241 E. 8th Street CL 2-1955 
DAVID LEVINE, 1996 Ocean Avenue DE 9-9413 
PHILIP LEVITZ, 2854 Brighton 6th Street NI 8-9280 
STANLEY LIKER, 73 1 Montgomery Street IN 7-7374 
LESLIE LIPNICK, 59 Brighton 1 1th Street NI 6-5656 
MANNY MELLER, 4420- 17th Avenue UL 4-4014 
LEWIS MUFSON, 705 Cleveland Street DI 5-1262 
MARK NADEL, 1333-5 1st Street GE 8-5844 
CHARLES NUSSBAUM, 2323 Avenue J CL 2-3345 
STEPHEN PLOTCH, 265 Quentin Road ES 6-1791 
MARTIN PLOTZKER, 1239-49th Street UL 4-3337 
GARY POLLACK, 527 Ashford Street EV 5-5308 
KENNETH PRAGER, 1725 E. 27th Street DE 9-4141 
MAURICE REIFMAN, 139-07 23 ht Street. Queens LA 7-5022 
ANDREW REINHARD. 949 E. 12th Street CL 2-5994 
FRED ROSEN, 715 Schenectady Avenue PR 2-3078 
MARTIN ROSEN, 184 E. 96th Street HY 5-0355 
SHELDON ROSENBERG, 1518 E. 96th Street CL 1-1032 
NATHAN ROSENBLATT, 46 12- 12th Avenue GE 5-5739 
MORRIS RUBENSTEIN, 705 Saratoga Avenue DI 2-5597 
LOUIS SAVADER. 412 Schenck Avenue DI 6-5214 
MELVIN SCHIFF, 8721 Bay Parkway ES 2-0553 
IRVING SHEINMAN, 5000- 15th Avenue HY 4-8684 
GARY SKLAR, 3 1 2 E. 98th Street EV 5-8976 
STEVEN SOLOMON, 1004 Union Street IN 7-7134 
MONTE SPERLING, 938-51st Street GE 8-3716 
ALB ERT TALL ANT, 490 Ashford Street AP 7-6 1 30 
KALMAN TUCHMAN, 1568 Union Street PR 2-3253 
MAYER UNTERBERG, 2368-83rd Street ES 2-1 171 
BARRY VOGEL, 1 1 96 Eastern Parkway HY 3-09 1 3 
LARRY WALLER, 1650-45th Street UL 3-9206 
MARTIN WANGROFSKY, 90 Legion Street HY 8-2565 
BENJAMIN WEBERMAN, 1080 E. 8th Street 
DAVID WEINSTEIN, 1077-54th Street GE 6-6718 
ZEV WEINSTEIN, 2343 Batchelder Street NI 8-1 164 
MANNY WEISS, 1020-44th Street UL 4-0207 
JACK WOLF, 7 1 1 4-2 1 St Street CL 9- 1 062 
MITCHEL WOLF, 1 652-47th Street HY 4-7 1 62 
GARY WOLFF, 363 Crown Street IN 7-5719 
MICHAEL WOLFF, 285 E. 9 1 st Street DI 5-4248 
MURRAY ZANGEN, 974-46th Street UL 4-4760 



127 



imU. 





The Heroic Encounter is never- 
ending. Each conflict becomes 
assimilated into the scope of our 
experiences, yet we no sooner con- 
quer one obstacle when we are faced 
with another formidable challenge. 
As we stand on the crossroads of 
our lives, and the future looms be- 
fore us, we must remember that all 
our actions lead to the recognition 
of the ultimate truth. 

M. Wolf 
K. Klein 



PHOTOS BY LORSTAN STUDIOS 



128 



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